Need advice for my Nuvi 350 a/c power supply

I bought a power supply from ebay that was advertised as being for the nuvi 350 (as well as other models). It has a standard mini usb port that fits my 350. However, the package did not mention GPSs. Here are the specs on the charger:

Travel Charger
Model T-HT-8125-SH
Input: 110-220v 50-60Hz
Output: 5.5v - 500mA

Are the Output volts and milliamps consistent with the Garmin charger?

I am traveling to Italy (have Italian map) and I found this on Italian outlets:

"Electricity in Italy is 230 Volts, alternating at 50 cycles per second. If you travel to Italy with a device that does not accept 230 Volts at 50 Hertz, you will need a voltage converter."

The specs above is ok on the Hertz but is rated at only 220v, so I assume I still have to use a converter. Is this correct?

Finally, I've been recharging through my computer's USB port. When I use the a/c charger, what can I expect to see on the screen. Will it indicate just that it's charging, or will it indicate that it is charging from an a/c outlet?

Comments

  • 220v is actually 240v (2 120v legs)

    Note**** I'm not saying your adapter is good or bad.

    My Belkin Travel Charger
    Model: USB-TC-01
    Input: 100-240v; 0.3A 50-60Hz
    Output: 5.5VDC; 1.0A

    My Belkin 12V Charger
    Model: USB-CLA
    Input: 12-24Vdc
    Output: 5.5Vdc; 700mA

    Both were supplied by Dell with an Axim PDA and can use any USB cable.

    BTW if your charger didn't come with adapter plugs for EURO/UK outlets it won't do you much good in Europe. See image below.

    image
  • Bulliever, thanks for the reply. Since mine has a lower milliamps rating (500) than your two Belkins, it seems that it will charge the gps just fine, except slower than your 700Ma or your 1.0.

    As for the adapter plug, you can get a US/Italy adapter for a couple of euro in any electric/electronic store. I already have one or two.

    If anyone else has any opinions or knowledge about my original question, I invite more replies.

  • Finally, I've been recharging through my computer's USB port. When I use the a/c charger, what can I expect to see on the screen. Will it indicate just that it's charging, or will it indicate that it is charging from an a/c outlet?
    You will see the same thing on the screen regardless of the charging source.

  • Finally, I've been recharging through my computer's USB port. When I use the a/c charger, what can I expect to see on the screen. Will it indicate just that it's charging, or will it indicate that it is charging from an a/c outlet?
    You will see the same thing on the screen regardless of the charging source.

    The Nuvi can't tell the difference, because regardless of the power source the unit is being charged by the output of the step-down transformer which should be approximately 5.5V DC.
  • If your question is can you use the 220 v rated charger on 230 v the answer is yes. A 220 volt item should run on 220-240 volts
  • North American Voltage Ranges

    In the US and Canada, 220 volts, 230 volts, and 240 volts are used interchangeably to describe one voltage range that is used to power larger appliances. Similarly, 110 volts, 115 volts, and 120 volts all refer to the one voltage range that is available through the common electrical outlet. The sources of these seemingly different numbers is as follows:

    1. The 220 volt and 110 volt designations are older and familiar terminology, but are no longer used in either product design or by electric utilities in the US and Canada.
    2. The 230 volt and 115 volt terminology comes from equipment design standards. Equipment is commonly designed to operate at 230 or 115 volts plus or minus 10%.
    3. Electric utilities typically deliver electricity, under standard conditions, at 240 volts and 120 volts plus or minus 5% at the transformer.

    When one takes into account that equipment is designed to accept voltage variations of 10% at a minimum and that the electric utility regularly delivers electricity within 5% of their standard, there is a good match between the voltage the electric utility delivers and the voltage equipment was designed to use.


    Source: http://www.quick220.com/220_about_voltages.htm
  • Thanks for the helpful info. That saves me from having to take the converter on my trip.
  • Based on the specs, you have a switched mode power adaptor. You will be fine.
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