This site uses cookies to offer you a better browsing experience. Find out more about how to manage cookies, or dismiss this message and continue to use cookies.

Is the Nuvifone Still Relevant?

Tim 1481 Points
edited November -1 in Smartphone Navigation
Now that the Palm Pre is out with navigation from TeleNav and the iPhone will have navigation from TomTom, Navigon, TeleNav, and Nav-n-Go, does that change your plans (or lack thereof) regarding the Garmin Nuvifone?
«1

Comments

  • gatorguy 326 Points
    It's certainly lost a lot of it's luster. It looks like Garmin regrets basing the original design on a linux platform, with Android appearing to be the way to go. It's a good thing for Garmin/Asus that the smartphone wars isn't a dash to the finish but more of a marathon. Over the next year or so they can still be relevant with the right moves, but they can't afford to run into more delays.
  • alokeprasad 102 Points
    The internet connectivity of the iPhone (or Pre) is the dealmaker for me. I'll switch to (probably) iPhone and give my Nuvi to my relatives.

    The question will be: Which one of of the smartphone software makes the best use of the updated traffic, POI, locator services etc? We are depnding on you, Tim, to guide us.

    :-)
  • Tim 1481 Points
    Which one of of the smartphone software makes the best use of the updated traffic, POI, locator services etc?
    And that is still a big, outstanding question with respect to TomTom on the iPhone as well as the Garmin devices.
  • mvl 191 Points
    Tim, if you want to meet up in a few weeks. I'll see if I can wrestle my upcoming N97 from my wife for a bit if you want to see it.

    I honestly don't think Nokia will be a big deal here, since Americans like subsidized phones. But it is a full fledged smartphone with Nokia city maps, and a 3 month trial of turn-by-turn. I'm not sure who built their turn-by-turn, but knowing the chumminess of Navteq and Garmin, wouldn't be surprised if Garmin powers it. Or if Garmin's got a secret OVI store app in the works.

    Seems like Symbian probes could be a counter to Tomtom HD Traffic in europe, not so sure with the low Nokia penetration in the US.
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    I have always questioned the viability of the Nuviphone, and with each passing day I think it becomes even less relevant. They should scrap this project and concentrate on what they do best - selling PND's. They could then offer their software to run on the more popular smartphones from other vendors.
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    One year ago, I thought it was a great idea. Even 6 months ago I saw a market for it with pretty good potential. Now I almost agree with you Boyd. Things just change so dang fast anymore. 5 years from now we'll be talking about glasses with routes or data projected on them, a very mobile head's up display.

    As long as the Incas aren't right about 2012 :!:
  • Tim 1481 Points


  • Blue Flame 91 Points
    I'd would be interested in a PDA cell phone, with a REAL GPS (one that works even without cell service or towers)...

    I'm on Verizon, all these new phone's, seem to come out for At&t. Besides not liking at&t much, coverage is poor in the areas I live, and drive (in the hills). Sense Garmin, seems too be overly profit minded, will they come out with a phone and GPS what works really good?
    Just look at there latest offerings, voice studding, screens that don't work correctly, bad routing engines, lac of custom ability, software bugs, and map releases - with no real updates or improvements to them? OK I admit, I'm very picky. I do expect things to work 100%.

    Are any of the other pnd's any better? From what I read, no. Being the best, in this case, is not a compliment really...
  • Spazmogen 0 Points
    When the NuviFone was 1st announced it was an interesting product. Then came the year long delay.

    I got fed up and bought a Blackberry Bold and the Garmin Mobile software (lifetime). It's all I need 90% of the time.
    The downside: it requires a data connection at all times.

    The NuviFone has onboard mapping. So it would work even in in areas of no cell coverage (like up North) or on a boat. I just spent a week North of Algonquin Park in Ontario and cell coverage was EDGE on a good day. There was no 3G service. Good thing I took the old Nuvi 650 with me.
  • mvl 191 Points
    Ovi/Nokia Maps are stored on the phone, no need for constant data connections unless you want live traffic.

    I think most phone-based navigation is heading in the same direction. Tomtom for Windows Mobile (europe only) or iPhone is also an on-phone solution.

    I could see a market for Garmin nuviphone in the low-end. For people who don't want the bells & whistles of a smartfone. Just a simple phone and a simple nav. But the touchscreen hardware may price it out of that market.

    At the high end I don't think the Nuviphone has a chance against the Blackberry/Pre/iPhone/Nseries - so I see no reason for someone to buy one.
  • Tim 1481 Points
    Interesting article in the NY Times today:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/08/technology/08gps.html?_r=1&ref=business
    “It’s the manifestation of our strategy to make TomTom available across different platforms, including the smartphone,” said Tom Murray, the company’s vice president for market development.

    Mr. Murray acknowledged that the iPhone and other smartphones were challenging stand-alone GPS hardware, but he said the company viewed it as a new avenue for revenue.

    “It’s not a threat, it’s an opportunity,” he said. “We want to make sure that when consumers opt for the iPhone as their exclusive navigation device, it’s our solution that they’re buying.”

    [...]

    Garmin, another leading GPS manufacturer, is taking a different approach. The company, based in the Cayman Islands, plans to release a combination navigational device and cellphone called the Nuviphone later this year.

    “GPS is one of the up-and-coming trends with mobile phones and becoming a must-have feature,” said Jessica Myers, a Garmin spokeswoman. “That is one of the reasons we started developing the phone.”

    Garmin has yet to announce carriers or pricing details. But the company’s bet — that it can beat established smartphone makers like R.I.M., Apple, Palm and HTC at their own game — is a risky one at best, said Julien Blin, principal analyst at JBB Research, who follows the industry.

    “It’s more like a desperate move. Now that you have the iPhone and the Pre, it’s just too late,” Mr. Blin said. Smartphones equipped with GPS “are the model moving forward that is going to be successful.”
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    I'm pretty much in Mr. Blin's corner on this one. The opportunity is quickly passing by. Only a matter of time, IMHO, before Garmin sees the writing on the wall and realizes that more attention needs to be paid to the mobile apps. For quite some time the TomTom/Garmin roles were reversed, with TomTom pretty much ignoring mobile development after their Navigator6 offering and Garmin adapting their mobile solution to different platforms while TomTom snoozed, one of the more recent being Garmin Mobile for Blackberry. Now the roles are reversed (again). I'd like to think they've been working on an iPhone platform app on the sly, but no hints that there's any activity there, nor on any other updated mobile OS.

    Something I find curious is that Garmin Mobile doesn't appear in the Blackberry App World offerings. :?
  • jeffcarp 0 Points
    The nuvifone is a lost cause and not relevant to the marketplace. Bring the Nuvi software to consumers on their devices. No GPS company is going to dictate my smartphone and my cell phone carrier to me. This is the ultimate example of Garmin who can't stop thinking like a hardware manufacturer. Those that can think and act like a software company will clearly win this battle. When RIM comes out with Dash software - watch out Garmin (and TeleNav).

    The Kansas City star had a decent article yesterday in follow up to the New Tork Times article. I say we load up the Kansas City Star website with our comments. They may read it. The link is below....

    http://economy.kansascity.com/?q=node/2737
  • PND4ME 0 Points
    Now that the Palm Pre is out with navigation from TeleNav and the iPhone will have navigation from TomTom, Navigon, TeleNav, and Nav-n-Go, does that change your plans (or lack thereof) regarding the Garmin Nuvifone?
    Garmin selling cell phones is like Goodyear selling navigation system, they can do it but not as well I'm sure.
    Here is the question I have for everyone, Do you want a navigation system that have smart phone ability or do you wish to own a smart phone with a navigation ability?
    Garmin is a navigation company, and if they would have launched the NuviFone a year ago as planed, they would have a better chance.
    For everyone that is tied to a 2 year contract now with the new 3 GS iPhone, they would more than likely not buy a NuviFone in my opinion.
    I have owned 3 generations of iPhone's including now the 3 GS and love the ability it offers. Navigation system is used only as a backup if my main PND is not around. So I would say for me, the NuviFone is not as attractive for what I need in a smart phone.

    Garmin have an excellent name like Goodyear, they just have to stay in their own business and not challenge others in their expertise.
    I think MID is the next waive to come with 5" displays that have connective and cell abilities.

    There is only room for 3 screens in our life, a PND or OEM display for your car, a smart phone or MID to travel with and soon a wrist watch that will have the ability to navigate, send emails and surf the web via voice command. lol....
  • Tim 1481 Points
    Garmin said it expects the PND "to continue to grow at a healthy rate for the next few years, while the handset navigation and subsidized netbook markets are developing," according to a spokeswoman.
  • PND4ME 0 Points
    Without the proper service provider like AT&T, I think Garmin NuviFone may not be in our future any time soon.
    I think the MID will probably be the way to go next
  • jeffcarp 0 Points
    What is a MID?
  • PND4ME 0 Points
    What is a MID?
    MID = Mobile Internet Device
  • jeffcarp 0 Points
    Interesting. Is there a product example in Europe or somewhere that is a prototype of what this will be? Or are people just conceptualizing on this forum? I presume it is some variation of a netbook?
    What is a MID?


    MID = Mobile Internet Device
  • PND4ME 0 Points
    Interesting. Is there a product example in Europe or somewhere that is a prototype of what this will be? Or are people just conceptualizing on this forum? I presume it is some variation of a netbook?
    What is a MID?


    MID = Mobile Internet Device
    There is a few but they are not really ready for prime time. Look at the Clarion MIND, you will get the baisc idea I think.
  • Tim 1481 Points
    You mean the Etch a sketch? :)
  • PND4ME 0 Points
    You mean the Etch a sketch? :)
    Just wait till Apple come out with their MID solution. As far as I'm concern the iPhone 3GS is pretty close to an MID already.
  • dhn 336 Points
    edited July 2009
    You mean the Etch a sketch? :)
    I just got a sneak preview Tim....

    For your eyes only.....

    image


    :D :D
  • Tim 1481 Points
    And here is the Clarion Mind:

    image
  • mvl 191 Points
    There have been a lot of news releases lately talking about the death of the PND since smartfones are taking over.

    I have a really hard time believing this is the case. In my experience smartfone navs barely hold water against PND quality. While I see the Tomtom mount addressing most of the iPhone GPS deficiencies, it still leaves you with a pretty tiny screen that's barely tolerable in a car.

    I also distrust the stat that says 40% of smartfone users and 80% of iPhone users use GPS. Maybe those are the % of people who have tried smartphone navs at least once. But smartfone users are tech savvy and have a decent disposable income, so I can't see that high a percentage living full time with the terrible excuse-of-a-nav that smartfones offer.

    PNDs will remain king of car navigation until someone builds the obvious solution: a big-screen smartfone dock. Plug a smartfone with good GPS software into a dock with a 7 inch car screen, and Tomtom-mount-like assisted-GPS hardware, and now you have quality car GPS. Even better if it can pair via wifi with the smartphone (is bluetooth fast enough for graphics?) so that you can leave the phone in your pocket and still run the GPS on the 7 inch.
    There is only room for 3 screens in our life, a PND or OEM display for your car, a smart phone or MID to travel with and soon a wrist watch that will have the ability to navigate, send emails and surf the web via voice command. lol....
    I almost agree, but I see different screens.

    1) Your tiny portable screen (1-2 inches). I prefer flip phones, but it appears you prefer a watch. (same idea either way) This would be your base system that contains the data and software all others talk to. It has to be the base, and it has to be tiny, because you'll carry this everywhere. Maybe one day we'll trust all our info to the google cloud, but I still feel there's something we'll want as our own off of the cloud. This is the base software, so the Nav app would live on this device.

    2) Your bigger portable screen (4-5 inches). I use a palm Tx, which is essentially a 1st generation MID. This screen may go straight to the net, or be a projection of your base mini phone/watch. It's the screen you go to when you need something bigger while out of the house. This will also be what laptops converge into.

    3) Your car screen (7-10 inches). Again this device would pair and project off of your tiny phone/watch. The safest and most usable size is way bigger than is practical to lug around as an MID. It would also be prewired into your car, talking to the onboard car computer for trip/fuel/speed info, and pre-wired into your car's radio, handsfree mic, and large all-in-one antenna.

    4) Your home screen (30+ inches). This is the one you forgot. The natural evolution and convergence of televisions and PCs. You can do the things that require the biggest-screens - watch movies, run excel spreadsheets, etc.

    Or, maybe foldable LED advances to the point where all 4 screens are the exact same...
  • PND4ME 0 Points
    There have been a lot of news releases lately talking about the death of the PND since smartfones are taking over.

    I have a really hard time believing this is the case. In my experience smartfone navs barely hold water against PND quality. While I see the Tomtom mount addressing most of the iPhone GPS deficiencies, it still leaves you with a pretty tiny screen that's barely tolerable in a car.

    I also distrust the stat that says 40% of smartfone users and 80% of iPhone users use GPS. Maybe those are the % of people who have tried smartphone navs at least once. But smartfone users are tech savvy and have a decent disposable income, so I can't see that high a percentage living full time with the terrible excuse-of-a-nav that smartfones offer.

    PNDs will remain king of car navigation until someone builds the obvious solution: a big-screen smartfone dock. Plug a smartfone with good GPS software into a dock with a 7 inch car screen, and Tomtom-mount-like assisted-GPS hardware, and now you have quality car GPS. Even better if it can pair via wifi with the smartphone (is bluetooth fast enough for graphics?) so that you can leave the phone in your pocket and still run the GPS on the 7 inch.
    There is only room for 3 screens in our life, a PND or OEM display for your car, a smart phone or MID to travel with and soon a wrist watch that will have the ability to navigate, send emails and surf the web via voice command. lol....
    I almost agree, but I see different screens.

    1) Your tiny portable screen (1-2 inches). I prefer flip phones, but it appears you prefer a watch. (same idea either way) This would be your base system that contains the data and software all others talk to. It has to be the base, and it has to be tiny, because you'll carry this everywhere. Maybe one day we'll trust all our info to the google cloud, but I still feel there's something we'll want as our own off of the cloud. This is the base software, so the Nav app would live on this device.

    2) Your bigger portable screen (4-5 inches). I use a palm Tx, which is essentially a 1st generation MID. This screen may go straight to the net, or be a projection of your base mini phone/watch. It's the screen you go to when you need something bigger while out of the house. This will also be what laptops converge into.

    3) Your car screen (7-10 inches). Again this device would pair and project off of your tiny phone/watch. The safest and most usable size is way bigger than is practical to lug around as an MID. It would also be prewired into your car, talking to the onboard car computer for trip/fuel/speed info, and pre-wired into your car's radio, handsfree mic, and large all-in-one antenna.

    4) Your home screen (30+ inches). This is the one you forgot. The natural evolution and convergence of televisions and PCs. You can do the things that require the biggest-screens - watch movies, run excel spreadsheets, etc.

    Or, maybe foldable LED advances to the point where all 4 screens are the exact same...

    mvl

    "There is only room for 3 screens in our life, a PND or OEM display for your car, a smart phone or MID to travel with and soon a wrist watch that will have the ability to navigate, send emails and surf the web via voice command. lol...."

    What I meant is for navigation purposes since this is a GPS forum right?

    A 30" inches screen for your home? I would think you mean for a PC possibly. I currently have a 58" display in my family room that I have my computer connected to already, and would have gone with a 65" but missed my wall opening by 1/4" or as Get Smart would say "missed it by that much" LMAO

    OK, the part you may forget is that the smartphone like the iPhone have the same size screen as most of the lower end PND unit which is 3.5". The iPhone can do more and can have static and dynamic mapping option, so we may not have to update maps since they can download fresh map daily if need be. This will make the iPhone more accurate regarding POI and street or highway traffic closure etc...

    This would be the same for the MID's. Mobile internet device should be a slim 5" display, any larger and it would be hard to place on the dash or to carry with you.

    The PND is a great value at $100 going down to $49 if Nextar have their way and they just navigate and nothing else. a no thrill unit that maybe for some but not for me.

    The smartphone that can dock in a car with a larger screen maybe an option since iPod is becoming so popular, I can see the OEM jumping on this and not having to put a OEM GPS and pay NavTeq the big loyalty for their mapping software.

    The cost for adding a 10" display and the need space will be a challenge for any manufacturers since the dash property is very valuable and I doubt that will happen anytime soon if you don't own a MAC truck.
    The watch I was talking about will be your cell phone, navigation,MP 3-4 what ever because the screen is only use for reference and it will be mostly if not all voice command input.

    I am in the PND business and hope it never goes away but I can tell you that it will because of the pricing, there are no motivation to play in this field since there is no profit to be made, and these GPS manufacturer is looking at net profit and don't care what you want if you don't pay, they take their ball home and you are left with nothing.

    So what we will end up with is bunch of cheap junk for $49 which I think is better to do without.

    I will stick with my iPhone and invest in the software and the mounting hardware and I can tell you when you use one of these units for pedestrian mode, you don't want to carry a 5" display around or try to stick one in your pocket! lol.... Pedestrian naviation will be the next big thing, going the last mile to the front door will be huge when the software is fine tune and hardware get even better.

    I love heads up display idea for GPS, navigation in eye glasses and there are companies already testing these features but most consumers think they should pay nothing for innovation so they get nothing for not wanting to pay for it.

    Problem is most consumers want the latest and greatest innovation for under $50, to bad! There is a way to get around that by charging $9.99 a month and sell the hardware that will be useless without the service for $50. lol....

    Good Luck
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    On a related note, I saw mention this morning, reportedly a Navigon tweet, that they will also be offering a hardware dock with an included gps chip. Several other improvements are supposed to be in a free update sometime this month for their iPhone nav app.
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    I also distrust the stat that says 40% of smartfone users and 80% of iPhone users use GPS. Maybe those are the % of people who have tried smartphone navs at least once. But smartfone users are tech savvy and have a decent disposable income, so I can't see that high a percentage living full time with the terrible excuse-of-a-nav that smartfones offer.
    I don't know where those numbers come from or what they include. But on the iPhone I would say at least 80% of owners (maybe more) "use GPS". The GPS capability is used in many, many applications - not just for auto navigation or routing. I think just about everybody uses Google Maps on their iPhone. And a huge percentage of people use other applications which tell them where the nearest restaurant is, where their friends are, etc.

    If we're talking about using the iPhone for auto navigation, that is certainly not anywhere near 80% though, and probably never will (or should) be.
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    Great point Boyd. I seldom use the navigation apps on my Blackberry (Telenav and Garmin Mobile), but I use apps that make use of the gps function everyday. Things like news feeds, social apps, weather, things to do/movies/restaurants, etc. So 80% isn't unreasonable.
  • mvl 191 Points
    The specific quote from the New York Times was:
    More than 40 percent of all smartphone owners use their mobile devices to get turn-by-turn directions, according to data from Compete, a Web analytics firm.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/08/technology/08gps.html

    I agree with Boyd, I bet the NYT misinterpreted GPS-enabled apps as "Turn by turn". This was the premise of their whole "PNDs are dead" (paraphrasing) article, and their likely misinterpretation really destroys their arguement.

    NYT also points to the severe decline in PND sales and the increase in smartfone sales as another reason for the PND's upcoming death. Both, in my opinion, are totally unrelated causes:
    - PND sales are declining because they are like the early PalmPilots - so good that no-one ever bothers upgrading (I still love my Palm TX). Plus anyone notice the economy lately?
    - Smartphones sales are booming because they're becoming so cheap that regular phone owners who ask for free/near-free subsidized phones get smartphones. Overall phone sales are probably dropping too, just cheap dumb-phones are being replaced with cheap smart-phones in the normal product cycle. iPhones are a well hyped anomaly, but in the overall cellphone market their unit sales are minimal.

    With my Nokia experience as an example, I think good PNDs have nothing to worry about from smartphones. Maybe Nextar has to worry about smartphones, but not mid-range or better products from bug guys. Garmin and Tomtom could probably make more margin from selling phone software online than from low-end (3.5") device sales anyways - I'm sure the hardware vendors and Best Buy eat up a ton of the MSRP.
    Nokia experience at: http://forums.gpsreview.net/discussion/13910/x/p1/

    I still think PNDs impending doom is coming from the car dock/car nav. Anyone who buys a good car GPS (Honda is one of the best out there) should never want to go back to a PND. It shocks me that the software innovation left the high-cost in-dash space and moved to the low-end PND space. It completely befuddles me how Tomtom can sell the best traffic and routing out there for $300 bucks and Honda can't stick it in a $2000 nav.

    Dashboard space is at a premium, but a proper on-dash computer can be 10" because the dash really needs nothing else on it. Proper voice commands and touchscreen car-buttons render every other middle-dashboard item (except the air vents) useless. And 10" is so much safer than a puny 4.3" nav.
  • Blue Flame 91 Points
    Without the proper service provider like AT&T, I think Garmin NuviFone may not be in our future any time soon.
    I think the MID will probably be the way to go next
    At&t Sucks. Poor customer service, poor coverage (dos not work well in many places I go), and well they suck. If I had to make a choice of At&t or no phone, I'd chose no phone...
  • PND4ME 0 Points
    The specific quote from the New York Times was:
    More than 40 percent of all smartphone owners use their mobile devices to get turn-by-turn directions, according to data from Compete, a Web analytics firm.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/08/technology/08gps.html

    I agree with Boyd, I bet the NYT misinterpreted GPS-enabled apps as "Turn by turn". This was the premise of their whole "PNDs are dead" (paraphrasing) article, and their likely misinterpretation really destroys their arguement.

    NYT also points to the severe decline in PND sales and the increase in smartfone sales as another reason for the PND's upcoming death. Both, in my opinion, are totally unrelated causes:
    - PND sales are declining because they are like the early PalmPilots - so good that no-one ever bothers upgrading (I still love my Palm TX). Plus anyone notice the economy lately?
    - Smartphones sales are booming because they're becoming so cheap that regular phone owners who ask for free/near-free subsidized phones get smartphones. Overall phone sales are probably dropping too, just cheap dumb-phones are being replaced with cheap smart-phones in the normal product cycle. iPhones are a well hyped anomaly, but in the overall cellphone market their unit sales are minimal.

    With my Nokia experience as an example, I think good PNDs have nothing to worry about from smartphones. Maybe Nextar has to worry about smartphones, but not mid-range or better products from bug guys. Garmin and Tomtom could probably make more margin from selling phone software online than from low-end (3.5") device sales anyways - I'm sure the hardware vendors and Best Buy eat up a ton of the MSRP.
    Nokia experience at: http://forums.gpsreview.net/discussion/13910/x/p1/

    I still think PNDs impending doom is coming from the car dock/car nav. Anyone who buys a good car GPS (Honda is one of the best out there) should never want to go back to a PND. It shocks me that the software innovation left the high-cost in-dash space and moved to the low-end PND space. It completely befuddles me how Tomtom can sell the best traffic and routing out there for $300 bucks and Honda can't stick it in a $2000 nav.

    Dashboard space is at a premium, but a proper on-dash computer can be 10" because the dash really needs nothing else on it. Proper voice commands and touchscreen car-buttons render every other middle-dashboard item (except the air vents) useless. And 10" is so much safer than a puny 4.3" nav.
    FYI

    TomTom already have a dash GPS solution and so does Garmin. Alpine did to with their Blackbird GPS.

    The Honda and Acura uses the Alpine GPS product although they are rated one of the best OEM indash navigation along with Denso, they are not as feature rich as some of the PND offering.

    It's interesting since the new smartphone is so efficient now that the PND market may suffer from these smartphone offering such as the new iPhone 3G S.

    My understanding of the PND market is Europe has already flatten out and although NA is still growling slightly in volume for the PND market, the net profit and over all cost of the unit have been dramatically compromised making these products ROI difficult for most GPS manufacturers.

    You may think that everyone will always wish to have a PND in their vehicle, and I would agree if these new smartphone is not so efficient and convenient.

    There was a time that I carry a camera and when on vacation I would carry a video camera to boot. Now with the new iPhone that will allow you to take quality pictures with the 3.0 megapixel camera and record true-blue video at 30 FPS videos feature and video up to an hour at a time, who would wish to bring an extra camera and video camera now while on business or pleasure trips. Certainly not the consumer that own these smartphones such as the new iPhone.

    Now come the GPS portion, as they make these application more up to date and eaiser and efficient, why would people wish to have an on dash PND when they are require to take the PND off the mount each time they park their vehicle so they don't get it stolen?

    No map updates to deal with vs PND, real time server base map updates that can off set the cost of the monthly service charge for the GPS functionality.

    If they have to mount and dismount a PND device each time they use it, it would be just as efficient to use their smartphone if they have the right mounting solutions wich most GPS manufacturers are coming out with a iPhone mounting solution that includes external GPS receiver and speaker, along with this, the unit can be charged through the mounting cradle which serves two purposes, the hands free speaker phone since the mount will have a loud enough speaker to use the phone for both turn by turn navigation and as a speaker phone.

    Do I wish the PND market to go away, NO! but like some of the old technology such as VCR and cameras that requires films, the market has changed to demand convenience and an all in one solution which I believe these smartphone already offer now.

    I guess the only chance is for the GPS manufacturers to consider offering the next generation of the Mobile Internet device with a 5" slimline display that utilizes the high speed 4G LTE network / WiMax speed first to differentiate their products from the smartphones.

    I would also recommend for these GPS manufacturers to ride the bandwagon and add apps and features to these new smartphone / iPhone, I''m pretty sure that the $9.99 per month charge for the TeleNav, Nav N Go and TomTom turn by turn navigation software would make these company better profit margin than selling a $99 PND product over the counter. No hardware and returns to deal with. Garmin and Magellan need to have more than the software application but a customize mounting solution that differentiate themselves from the rest.

    This is a very tough business to be in, and for Auto Nav 2000 Plus, Inc being a GPS specific retailer for nearly 15 years and we are very lucky that we are still in business.

    I have better performance out of AT&T in my area than Nextel. I hated the drop calls with Nextel but I'm sure all phone service have their limitations
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    At&t Sucks. Poor customer service, poor coverage (dos not work well in many places I go), and well they suck.
    Have you ever been a customer yourself? Like everything else, I'm sure there are regional differences. I had Verizon Wireless for about 8 years before switching to AT&T and getting an iPhone. I certainly would have preferred to stay with Verizon if it were possible as I was a happy customer.

    But honestly, I have not had any issues whatsoever with AT&T yet. Their coverage is a bit different than Verizon, but no worse. I barely got cell service at my home in the sticks with Verizon. It's even slightly worse with AT&T, but neither were really usable, so no diff. In other rural areas I find I sometimes will get a strong AT&T signal where I got no Verizon signal... or vice versa.

    Switching was trivial, less trouble than I expected. I got my iPhone at an Apple store. 15 minutes after walking in I was headed back out the door. By the time I got to my car and tried the iPhone, I had a txt message saying my number had been ported.

    Who knows, my opinion could change someday, but I am happy so far. If everybody thought "AT&T sucks", they would not be having the phenomenal success they enjoy with the iPhone.
  • PND4ME 0 Points
    At&t Sucks. Poor customer service, poor coverage (dos not work well in many places I go), and well they suck.


    Have you ever been a customer yourself? Like everything else, I'm sure there are regional differences. I had Verizon Wireless for about 8 years before switching to AT&T and getting an iPhone. I certainly would have preferred to stay with Verizon if it were possible as I was a happy customer.

    But honestly, I have not had any issues whatsoever with AT&T yet. Their coverage is a bit different than Verizon, but no worse. I barely got cell service at my home in the sticks with Verizon. It's even slightly worse with AT&T, but neither were really usable, so no diff. In other rural areas I find I sometimes will get a strong AT&T signal where I got no Verizon signal... or vice versa.

    Switching was trivial, less trouble than I expected. I got my iPhone at an Apple store. 15 minutes after walking in I was headed back out the door. By the time I got to my car and tried the iPhone, I had a txt message saying my number had been ported.

    Who knows, my opinion could change someday, but I am happy so far. If everybody thought "AT&T sucks", they would not be having the phenomenal success they enjoy with the iPhone.
    I second that! lol....
  • I think the success or failure of any future nav/phone whatever device will be on the way you pay for it.

    At the moment I have a garmin 255t and a samsung pixon, the pixon has gps, with google maps aboard, and I have used amaze gps as well which is free.

    At the moment the garmin is the better device as it has a nice clear display and decent speed cam and traffic updates which are good.

    If i didnt have the Garmin I think I could live without it and use the amaze application, its only real downside is here in the UK, teleatlas wont give amaze the full postcode search which is a pain. They are putting foxytag speed cam on the next version which is pretty good, and its all free as a bird to use.

    the Nuvifone could be a winner depending on how expensive it is for map updates and traffic / cams etc. If it is going to cost a fortune the extra price will not be worth it as some of the free to use apps come in with better and better software. If they include updates in the cost of the contract, and not by adding £20 / $40 a month for the joy of it, it has every chance of working.

    I would be much happier carrying one device around rather than two, i certainly wouldnt leave the garmin in the car, way too much chance of theft, so I have no choice.

    Anyone that doesnt think the pnd will be overtaken by the phone with nav on it is living in cloud cuckoo land, it is nearly here already.

    Remember those huge bricks known as carphones?? Well they don't exist anymore and the dedicated pnd will go the same way eventually, probably not for a few years, but it will do, the technology improves too quickly, it's a done deal.
  • Tim 1481 Points
    Word is that the Nuvifone will cost $400 with a two year contract. A $100 rebate will bring the price down to $300 with a two year contract.
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    Would this be at AT&T? Sounds like a tough sell to me, with the 32gb Iphone 3Gs going for $300. Or get a 16gb iPhone 3Gs for $200 and add TomTom or Navigon...
  • Yes, AT&T. I guess the upside is that you wouldn't have to buy more nav software. :roll:
  • Tim 1481 Points
    Would this be at AT&T? Sounds like a tough sell to me, with the 32gb Iphone 3Gs going for $300. Or get a 16gb iPhone 3Gs for $200 and add TomTom or Navigon...
    Yes, AT&T. Also note that the iPhone 3G (with GPS) is still available for $100 with contract.
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    Exactly... you could get a 3g iPhone and a Nuvi 255wt for the price of a Nuvifone.
  • Tim 1481 Points
    According to an Engadget rumor, it looks like the Nuvifone will land Oct 4.

    image
  • According to an Engadget rumor, it looks like the Nuvifone will land Oct 4.

    image
    You buying one Tim? I like to get one just for testing purposes but to have two AT&T contract or to pay $550 for one is questionable. Never know, may do it anyway's.

    Besides the navigation software, I don't think Garmin can compete with Apple iPhone features sad to say.
  • Tim 1481 Points
    You buying one Tim? I like to get one just for testing purposes but to have two AT&T contract or to pay $550 for one is questionable. Never know, may do it anyway's.
    The price is a bit steep for me.
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    They'll be on U-Bid within a few months for $50 :lol:
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    Looking at those specs above, talk time of 4 hours and standby time of 240 hours is nothing to brag about. The iPhone 3g and 3gs are rated at 5 hours talk/300 hrs standby: http://www.apple.com/iphone/compare-iphones/
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    It didn't take long for Garmin to start marketing it. Got an email with a demo link and pricing detail just a bit ago.
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    Yes, it has finally appeared at att.com:

    http://www.wireless.att.com/cell-phone-service/cell-phone-details/?device=Nuvifone(TM)+G60&q_sku=sku4000279
  • Tim 1481 Points
    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2353744,00.asp

    I was able to access it on AT&T's site as far back as Friday I think. Anyway... I don't typically promote reviews from elsewhere, but I'm not certain yet if I'll do my own review of the Nuvifone. PC Mag just came out with their review.
    Unfortunately, Garmin spent almost two years bringing this phone to market, and it feels like a 2007-era device.[...] It's like Garmin gave up halfway through the development cycle and released what it had.
    Interestingly, one of the positives they note about the Nuvifone is the battery life-- yet battery life is one of the biggest criticisms people have about the iPhone, yet the Nuvifone's battery life is even less.
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    Unfortunately, Garmin spent almost two years bringing this phone to market, and it feels like a 2007-era device.[...] It's like Garmin gave up halfway through the development cycle and released what it had.
    It is just so 2007! :lol:

    Actually Garmin did give up halfway through the development cycle and hand it over to Asus.... right?
  • Tim 1481 Points
    Pretty much, yes.
Sign In or Register to comment.
↑ Top