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Why does the Nuvi keep trying to take me on back roads?

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  • - the nuvis think that the speed limits on our 100 kph expressways (like the 400 series) are 100 kph

    - for our 80 kph highways (e.g. most of the roads in the boonies), the nuvis think they're all 90 kph routes

    - 60 kph city streets are all 70 kph streets in the nuvis' eyes

    - for many of the 50 kph city streets, the nuvis think they're 70!

    - 40 kph and lower residential roads are all 50 kph to nuvis

    I am honestly curious as to how and where you get these numbers.What you say makes sense.I am just wondering how you figured it out.Thanks! :)
  • Just use the GPS simulator mode to travel various routes and watch the speed.

    Bear in mind that it works best if you reset your unit first, so it forgets what it's learned about your driving speeds.
  • @Slicerwizard

    Excellent post ! Now how do we get Garmin to read it ?? and then DO something.

    BOB
  • I think slicer made a very good post, but I think Garmin has their hands a bit tied too because I agree that the maps have inaccurate data so Garmin cant do anything about it and as slicer sugests Garmin implemented his ideas then as the maps get updated the nuvis would still provide incorrect calculations.

    The solution here lies in faster map updates. Allow folks to make corrections to the maps and make it available to everybody.

    I am constantly providing correction to Navteq and it gets discouraging to see that after 6 months and the correction is still pending and nothing has been done.
  • I cant edit my last post anymore.

    I browsed thru this thread and I think most of the problems that people are experiecing have to do with road block sections not connection properly in the map... by that I mean that the nuvi see the road as a dead end and has to calculate an alternate road.

    Best sugestion I have is to report all these glitches to Navteq using their map report tool here : http://mapreporter.navteq.com/

    The more people are reporting the faster they fix it and the faster it will show up on your map.
  • Allowing Garmin to get away with a sub standard product because of THEIR choice of map data supplier is just a cop out.

    Garmin are the supplier to us the customer and they need to do a better job with their mapping data supplier to make their product acceptable to use.

    BOB
  • See my thread on 2460LMT + Manhattan = Epic Fail.

    It's a new low for Garmin routing.
  • jonnop 101 Points
    Why is it that one of the longest threads is full of moans about Garmin?

    Ok, so the products have their own little idiosyncrasies. They may try to route you via strange places. You should not forget that your Nuvi is a clever piece of equipment but it has been programmed by humans. It makes mistakes but so do we all. Do you remember the days when you had to rely entirely on a map to get you to new places? Did you (or your wife) never make a mistake? The nuvi gets things right a darn site more often that it makes mistakes!

    If you know that the Nuvi is trying to take you on a backroad, ignore it and it will catch up with you.

    Again I often wonder why so many people need a satnav on regular commuter runs - you already know the route and so if nuvi tries to take you off it again you ignore it.

    I see that this topic is in the section entitled "Garmin Support". Perhaps there should be a new section named "Garmin Moans" and leave the support section for genuine support.
  • Allowing Garmin to get away with a sub standard product because of THEIR choice of map data supplier is just a cop out.

    Garmin are the supplier to us the customer and they need to do a better job with their mapping data supplier to make their product acceptable to use.

    BOB
    Don't like it, don't buy it. Having used gps devices for more years than I care to remember every one of them has had quirks. The best consumer automotive nav system I've ever used is DeLorme's Street Atlas or Topo series, but that requires a PC (which can be a little inconvenient depending on the vehicle). The Garmin gets me from point A to point B, and if I have no idea where point B is, which is the reason for a nav system in the first place, I'm not going to worry over how it does it.
  • Don't like it, don't buy it

    That would be great advice if Garmin gave us all 6 months to find out how bad the device can be and then gave us our money back !!

    The whole point of a GPS is to give you confidence that you are on the right and best route, I use mine for routes that I know well as it is my hands free phone a speed warning reminder !!
    If you know that the Nuvi is trying to take you on a backroad, ignore it and it will catch up with you.
    That is what I do if I know the route but when I don't how do I know that the Garmin is not right ???
  • Why is it that one of the longest threads is full of moans about Garmin?

    Ok, so the products have their own little idiosyncrasies. They may try to route you via strange places. You should not forget that your Nuvi is a clever piece of equipment but it has been programmed by humans. It makes mistakes but so do we all. Do you remember the days when you had to rely entirely on a map to get you to new places? Did you (or your wife) never make a mistake? The nuvi gets things right a darn site more often that it makes mistakes!

    If you know that the Nuvi is trying to take you on a backroad, ignore it and it will catch up with you.

    Again I often wonder why so many people need a satnav on regular commuter runs - you already know the route and so if nuvi tries to take you off it again you ignore it.

    I see that this topic is in the section entitled "Garmin Support". Perhaps there should be a new section named "Garmin Moans" and leave the support section for genuine support.
    So, your response is to travel routs that you are already with so you can ignore the GPS guidance? That GPS units are flawed & we shouldn't expect the mfg. to make a quality product? I don't have the same perspective. If my coffee maker didn't make good coffee, I would not use it. As mentioned elsewhere, it is not possible to get a refund a few weeks down the road when you find that the somewhat expensive device doesn't do the job. The manufacturers that don't/can't produce quality products would love it if all prospective customers believed as you do. In a way, I envy your attitude, as it must make life easy when you have such low expectations for your purchases.
    I apologize if this offends, I am just frustrated that Garmin seems to be dismissive of the inadequacies of their products. They are sooooo close & could be such a superior product with a bit of effort.
    Thanks for letting me rant.
    kev
  • sussamb 813 Points
    Jonnop didn't say what you quote in your first sentence, you need to read his comments properly rather than just continue with your moan at Garmin, which is becoming tedious. If you have some additional constructive comments to make please do so.
  • rather than just continue with your moan at Garmin, which is becoming tedious
    The thing that IS tedious about the "moaning" is that Garmin seem to completely ignore its customers !

    Unlike you, sussamb, I use my GPS every day as I travel for my work all across the UK/Europe and this kind of usage throws up the failings with the routing in the Garmin at an alarming rate.

    I agree with bugeyed, Garmin are very close to a good product but their lack of attention to detail is very frustrating and spoiling their reputation as a quality GPS unit manufacturer.

    Sensible routing has to be the priority of any GPS unit and Garmin have dropped the ball on this aspect - the sooner they realise this and take some action the better.
  • jonnop 101 Points
    For god's sake, someone please close this topic!
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    I don't see a reason to close this topic at this point... just ignore if it bothers you. But I would like to remind everyone of our policy regarding "rants"...
    We don't care what you say negative about the quality of any GPS product so long as you are actually asking for help and speaking about the facts. The members of this forum participate primarily to assist other members get the most out of their device. If you are not seeking assistance to fix a problem, trying to learn a new feature, or trying to help another user with their issue then your post might not belong in this forum.
  • sussamb 813 Points
    Unlike you, sussamb, I use my GPS every day as I travel for my work all across the UK/Europe and this kind of usage throws up the failings with the routing in the Garmin at an alarming rate.

    I'm not sure what makes you think you're 'unlike me'. At least in GPS usage :)

    I've used GPS for many years, and not just Garmin, although I do only own Garmin now, both handheld and two auto units. Why Garmin? Because they work for me. I occasionally see some weird routing, but as jonnop pointed out it's far better than the 'old' method of having to stop every so often to look at a paper map. With my Garmin I can zoom out, or review the route if I think it may be wrong. Or I can simply sit back and relax knowing that my nuvi will get me there, wherever 'there' might be.

    Incidentally, and just to set the record straight, I do use my GPS pretty much every day, both in the UK and Europe :evil:
  • jonnop 101 Points
    Like sussamb, I too tend to use my GPS most of the time. When I am in familiar areas it is in non-navigational mode; it is simply there giving me a pretty accurate of how fast I am driving and warning of speed cameras.

    I normally use navigation when on a longer journey when the traffic avoidance can be pretty good. the occasional quirks can make life interesting but nothing to worry about.

    Having the GPS for navigation has, most certainly, led to much less stress with my wife who used to do the navigating. She does still argue, not with me but with the GPS so I stay out of the disagreement!

    Apart from this topic, I have found the support items very useful and thank all those who have responded when I have had a question to ask.
  • Tim 1480 Points
    In my experience, people rarely agree on the best route so I don't expect to agree with the GPS when I know the route well. Every GPS on the market today will create some crazy routes from time to time. Although it may seem so, this is not a simple problem with a simple fix. Routing is very, very complicated.
  • sussamb 813 Points
    Thanks Tim, that pretty much nails that one :D :wink:
  • Jonnop didn't say what you quote in your first sentence, you need to read his comments properly rather than just continue with your moan at Garmin, which is becoming tedious. If you have some additional constructive comments to make please do so.
    I did read his comments properly & the statement "If you know that the Nuvi is trying to take you on a backroad, ignore it and it will catch up with you." prompted my first statement! How else will I know if the Garmin is taking me on a back road than to travel familiar routes. I don't need a Garmin on these trips.
    One simple solution IMO would be, instead of having exclusively "exclusions" they should have a preferences menu. In most cases I would select highways when traveling & maybe the unit wouldn't take me off the hwy through a city. That would solve most of the routing issues that effect me.
    I apologize if I "moaned", but what is becoming tedious for me, is the defense of Garmin's routing weaknesses & insistence that we need to lower our expectations on the products.

    Thanks,
    kev
  • kenp 92 Points
    Maybe I shouldn't join in now that the latest discussion has settled down, but am I the only one who can find adventure and amusement, rather than frustration, in routing quirks? I can thank a lot of the info in this thread for giving me that ability.

    Just to stay on topic on "Why?"I've found that an out of date detail in the map can lead to really mind boggling routes.

    Ken
  • Although it may seem so, this is not a simple problem with a simple fix. Routing is very, very complicated.
    Well TomTom have managed it ! I have now largely gone back to my old Go 730 that even with an out of date map does not try and detour me off the motorway EVER !
    I apologize if I "moaned", but what is becoming tedious for me, is the defense of Garmin's routing weaknesses & insistence that we need to lower our expectations on the products.
    I could not agree more with this comment.
    adventure and amusement
    Great, but not good if you have a living to earn.
  • Tim 1480 Points
    Well TomTom have managed it !
    Many TomTom owners would disagree.
  • @struttob Absolutely.
    This thread is constructive and very long because there is a real problem. It's not a moan zone thread IMHO but constructive as people share work around for SOME of the cases. Turning off Traffic Trends will make things much better for instance.

    FWIW my TomTom OneXL rarely does bizarre routing even with outdated maps and no voice spoken street names. I'm not saying in certain situations it's been perfect because it hasn't but it's no where near as bizarre as Garmin seems to be on a consistent basis.

    Every trip is an adventure with this thing.

    I use it on routes that I am familiar with just to see how it routes me.
    Of course I don't expect it to be perfect but the problems I've complained about are consistent across enough different areas so as to indicate it's not solely poor maps but some poor choices in the algorithms.
    I've found the speed limits it shows to be quite accurate BTW. And the maps are accurate as well at least for the places I have traveled across the country.

    My latest experience was when I traveled to Austin a few weeks ago. Going back to the airport from the hotel (about 35 miles away) the signs on the highway say exit for airport. The exit leads to another 65mph highway. We are no where near the airport mileage wise yet BTW. Maybe 10 miles away. Garmin says stay on the current highway. I stay on the highway and end up going some convoluted route full of red lights and 35 MPH roads going through towns because it has me exit the highway about 2 miles later.

    I'm confident next time I go there I will follow the signs because that way had to be better than the route the Garmin took me.
    Did I get to the airport?
    Yes.
    But it is just another example of oddball routing.

    None of these units is perfect because choices, very complex choices have to be made and like someone else stated my idea of best route may not be yours as well.

    However when I am constantly shaking my head at the routing then there is a problem because it's happening too frequently. I've reported it to Garmin several times but I don't expect any answers because most people will just accept it as the state of the technology.
    That argument falls apart however when a 3 year old unit outperforms a state of the art unit at least for basic routing.

    Just my 2 cents.
  • Well TomTom have managed it !

    Many TomTom owners would disagree.
    With the current TomTom models, yea, they have a whole set of problems from what I am reading. The older models were much better IMHO.
  • I can only judge by what I have experienced - my 3 year old Go 730 has NEVER tried to take me off a motorway at one junction - take me through a bunch of side roads- and then put me back on the same motorway at the next junction !!!

    It has NEVER taken me off an exit ramp and then straight back down the entry ramp of a motorway junction.

    It has NEVER routed me onto side roads that run parallel with the motorway!

    I may not always agree with the route provided but it does not do STUPID things like my Garmin does.
  • What I would like to know is why does it take Navteq so long to make corrections to the maps while Teleatlas (thats what google uses right?) is super fast?

    I drove yesterday to an area that I havent been for a few months to find out brand new roads. Of course they didnt exist on my Nuvi with the latest map but when I got home and looked at google maps, there they were... so I went to the navteq website to check and they are not there either. Who know when they will show up.... I know of a road that has been built for close to two years now and it still doesnt exist for Navteq and I have reported it on their website. Google has it of course...
    This is just an example of why Garmin needs to dump Navteq and partner with someone that can produce updated maps more frequently.
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    What I would like to know is why does it take Navteq so long to make corrections to the maps while Teleatlas (thats what google uses right?)
    Wrong. Google uses Google. At different times in the past they have used both Navteq and Teleatlas. However when Google changes their maps, you get the data instantly. It is being streamed to you live over their servers. On any dedicated PND the data must first be packaged in a big file covering all of North America, sent to Garmin, tweaked to their own needs and then offered for download.

    It's really apples and oranges. You could use a smartphone if you want instant map updates. Garmin has a StreetPilot app in fact.
  • Thanks for the correction Boyd. I wasnt sure about the provider for Google.

    But my point was that with navteq its going to be ages before these roads show up while google have them already and the roads were built just a few months ago.
    Your argument would be valid about the packaging and format if navteq themselves already had it on their own maps but they dont.

    I know that if navteq added the road now I would have to wait till february to have it on my nuvi.

    Like I said theres a road that is now 2 years old and it doesnt exist for navteq. I have reported it months ago. Google has it.

    How can Google manage to add these roads so quickly while Navteq cant?
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    How can Google manage to add these roads so quickly while Navteq cant?
    Nokia owns Navteq and has a market cap of $18 billion. Google has a market cap of $202 billion. Do you think that might have something to do with it? :wink:

    I've seen Google-cars cruising around a number of times, but don't think I've ever seen a Navteq car. Maybe they are unmarked though?
  • alanb 539 Points
    There is a picture of a Navteq mapping vehicle in this CNET article: http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-13746_7-20112918-48/mapping-streets-with-a-navteq-field-team/
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    Cool, thanks. Nope, never saw one of those.
  • Tim 1480 Points
    They've got a bunch of different type of vehicles. I've seen those and I've also seen basic sedans with a small emblem on the side of the car door that made it not stand out that much.
  • How can Google manage to add these roads so quickly while Navteq cant?


    Nokia owns Navteq and has a market cap of $18 billion. Google has a market cap of $202 billion. Do you think that might have something to do with it? :wink:

    But how much of that money is allocated to the map budget?
    I think its clear that one of the major achiles heel of Garmin is the maps and hence the reason for this long thread.
    I dont know if Garmin is one of the biggest Navteq customers but I would imagine that they are and they should be putting the pressure on Navteq to improve updating the maps. As it stands at the speed that Google updates their maps and with the smartphone penetration how long before Garmin will start feeling the pinch?
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    Clearly Garmin is already "feeling the pinch". Nevertheless they have, by far, the lion's share of the market.
  • The nuvi will make you do 5 road changes if it thinks it will save you 60 seconds. Maybe this makes sense on a 4-minute route, but it's silly on a 60-minute route.

    It's a bit too literal when it says "fastest" route, where we really want a "fast enough" route. When two routes are within, say, 3% of each other on time -- then there are better factors to choose from, and I'd pick "simpler" which means "less road changes".
  • I was led to this website by a link on Garmin's own forum to Lilla's valuable tutorials on the inner workings of my 1490LMT (http://forums.gpsreview.net/discussion/23239/x/p1/ and http://forums.gpsreview.net/discussion/23713/x/p1/). But once I finished with those this enormous thread immediately caught my eye because of my growing frustration with the bizarre and nonsensical routing choices my unit has been making with increasing frequency in the 18 months since I purchased it.

    I'm not going to give my version of all the incidents I have experienced similar to those already reported in this thread. But L.A. and Orange County freeway travelers will scratch their heads at this one: Quickest route setting, traffic and toll avoidances (but doesn't matter what time of day) -- Southbound I-405 on a continuing trip down the 405 approaching the 405-73-55 triangle in Costa Mesa consistently routes off the 405 at the 73 to Baker St; Baker St across to the 55 and north on the 55 to go back on to the I-405 south -- to no purpose whatsoever.

    My 1490 worked almost perfectly without these glitches and mystery routes with the software originally installed but the problems started and increased with the quarterly updated maps on my lifetime plan. Like others, in my home area I've found the best strategy is to just continue down the chosen freeway and ignore Jill's suggestions (I love her Australian voice). But knowing what the GPS misroutes in my home area causes me to doubt what it is telling me when traveling.

    The 1490 is the first GPS I have ever owned. I am happy with its features. I am reluctant to follow one poster's suggestion to erase what it collects about my driving habits in order to try to fool the misrouting algorithms because it is uncannily accurate at estimating my arrival times on familiar routes (speed limits be damned [everybody drives 75-80 mph in SoCal when traffic allows and the 1490 has learned it]). It is always accurate within 2 minutes on a 45+ minute trip regardless of traffic conditions. I'm usually in the HOV lane with my wife, so it is ordinarily unnecessary to follow Jill's traffic escape reroutes.

    But as nice as the 1490 is with its bells and whistles the reason it is my first GPS is that the best navigation aid I ever used was Microsoft Streets and Trips in the US and Microsoft Auto Route in the UK and Europe. I disagree with one of the previous posters who said a solution to the Nüvi misrouting is to zoom out to visualize the whole route. In my experience zooming out renders a visual that is of no use at all. Not so with Streets and Trips and Auto Route on a laptop screen. The only problems I ever encountered was their USB GPS receiver would drop signals a little more than the Nüvi and the Microsoft programs didn't seem to know the difference between a street and a trail. The only problem that ever created for me was nearly embedding my rental car in mud when I took what was marked as a street in Tuscany and found out it was a poorly maintained farm road. I would still be using the Microsoft programs but my wife put her foot down and refused to carry the laptop in the passenger seat anymore -- hence my Nüvi purchase.

    I hope Garmin takes the problems raised by its customers more seriously than it appears they are doing. I'll continue with Garmin but only because I've got lifetime maps and traffic so I have nothing to lose financially. But I can foresee going with a smart phone or iPad in the future and relying more on Google for my routes if Garmin doesn't improve their routing.
  • One thing positive I have found is that the arrival time is very, very accurate in most cases. Garmin's interface is also the best IMHO and the voice recognition is very good as well.
  • Like others, in my home area I've found the best strategy is to just continue down the chosen freeway and ignore Jill's suggestions (I love her Australian voice). . . . I'm usually in the HOV lane with my wife, so it is ordinarily unnecessary to follow Jill's traffic escape reroutes.
    Oops. I meant "Karen" (Jill's the American English voice).
  • One thing positive I have found is that the arrival time is very, very accurate in most cases. Garmin's interface is also the best IMHO and the voice recognition is very good as well.
    "Voice recognition" as in Bluetooth outgoing phone calls? Or what do you mean -- the clarity of the computer voice instructions?
  • One thing positive I have found is that the arrival time is very, very accurate in most cases. Garmin's interface is also the best IMHO and the voice recognition is very good as well.
    "Voice recognition" as in Bluetooth outgoing phone calls? Or what do you mean -- the clarity of the computer voice instructions?
    Voice instructions.

    "Go Home" etc.

    The Bluetooth is terrible when paired with my Crackberry.
    Volume too low and people on the other end hear all kinds of car noise etc.
  • I don't think the problem here is Navteq. Since 2003 my parents have had three vehicles with factory installed navigation systems. None of them have had any routing issues, and I don't see any of the problems discussed here coming up in the OEM car forums that use Navteq as the map supplier (most of them).

    Are you all sure the problem isn't Garmin? I highly doubt Navteq supplies different maps to OEM's vs. companies like Garmin.

    Haven't started using my 1490T yet since it already went in because of a bad speaker, but I'll know next week. One poster here said he didn't have any problems before doing an update. Did any others experience the same thing?
  • 1. There are pluses and minuses in every technology. Make it affordable and simple to use is the plus that creates minuses.
    2. The intricacy of new graphic display and directional technology to make the Garmin better is beyond imagination from even recent years. Give it a chance and do not expect tomorrows technology to be finished today.
    3. It is not just the map suppliers but the people that have to keep reinterpreting the map and build the algorithms that do the routing.
    4. If you have so little idea of where you are going that you do not know the general route and get off, you should have someone else drive you. Or forget about the gps and take out the paper map [ from several years ago] .
    5. Stop complaining about the off routes like it is the rule, it is not. Generally, for the general public, the Nuvi works great. You are the exception.
    6. If you want to pay for more than quarterly updates you are in the minority, as most want forever to come faster at no cost. An option for monthly at cost would be a good idea for the business traveler .
    7. And more should see that a "potential" diversion off the track could be adventurous, it is not an intelligent requirement, it is an interaction between human and 'computer' which will be around for a long while.

    BUT, I do agree, that because this is the most discussed "problem" with even the latest Garmin, it should be addressed, if not with a solution, with a statement. If that was done, it would reduce the ire of some which would reduce threads like this.

    m.
  • I agree with this. If you look on Amazon the reviews are overwhelmingly positive for these models. That just wouldn't be the case if the issue is as apparent as this thread makes it out to be.
  • kenp 92 Points
    4. If you have so little idea of where you are going that you do not know the general route and get off, you should have someone else drive you. Or forget about the gps and take out the paper map
    I view the GPS as that other person. :)

    One of the fun things (to me) about navigating by GPS is that very often I don't know where I am and I wouldn't have a clue where I was or how to get home if the GPS died. Adds a little adventure to my life.

    More often than not, though, the GPS has made things easier by showing me a better way even if I knew the general route.

    Ken
  • Anyone complaining about todays quality should have been around back when I first started with a laptop and the early Street Atlas. Even as bad as it was it was a great help traveling unknown territory and planning trips.
  • If you look on Amazon the reviews are overwhelmingly positive for these models. That just wouldn't be the case if the issue is as apparent as this thread makes it out to be.
    Most of the reviews on Amazon are posted within a day to a couple months of the purchaser's receipt of the item. The routing problems universally described in this thread and Garmin's brush off of complaints about them occur quite awhile into the ownership period when the user becomes a little more expert in using the GPS units and starts noticing the mistakes they make.

    Granted, there are quite a few conscientious reviewers on Amazon who report about their products months and years after their purchase. Granted also that even I don't have much negative to say about my 1490LMT but for its annoying route choices that only occur once in awhile. As C. James' Amazon review http://www.amazon.com/Garmin-Bluetooth-Portable-Navigator-Lifetime/product-reviews/B003ZX8B3W/ref=pr_all_summary_cm_cr_acr_txt?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1 states:

    "The routes it comes up with are 4.5 star, it hits most very very well but will toss a few more odd ones out than my old Garmin did, they all do some, I think this could do better, the good news is these are not horrible routes, just not the better or best always. . . . Overall I have to say I am very happy with the Garmin 1490LMT, I could not give it a full 5 for the things it fell just a little short on to me, but if I was to make the decision on a model again with what I know, I would buy it again, I think it would be hard to beat."

    I agree with the comment and the score.
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    Here you go... your nuvi's bad routing could cost you $12,000 plus Christmas in jail.... :roll:

    http://www.wtae.com/news/30058384/detail.html#ixzz1hOCKodY5
    Madison told Parsons he was driving a chemical tanker from South Carolina to Halliburton's plant near Carmichaels, Pa., on Monday when his GPS directed him off Interstate 79 and onto country roads that have a 10-ton weight limit.

    Madison's truck weighed three times that.

    He was cited by a Pennsylvania State Police trooper for two traffic violations that carry a total fine of $12,000.
    Seriously... this guy should have known better.
  • Maybe an IQ test should be required befor getting a GPS :roll:
  • Here you go... your nuvi's bad routing could cost you $12,000 plus Christmas in jail.... :roll:

    http://www.wtae.com/news/30058384/detail.html#ixzz1hOCKodY5
    Madison told Parsons he was driving a chemical tanker from South Carolina to Halliburton's plant near Carmichaels, Pa., on Monday when his GPS directed him off Interstate 79 and onto country roads that have a 10-ton weight limit.

    Madison's truck weighed three times that.

    He was cited by a Pennsylvania State Police trooper for two traffic violations that carry a total fine of $12,000.
    Seriously... this guy should have known better.
    Well, if he was using one of our Garmins he's an idiot. If he was using what he was supposed to -- something like the Dezl 560 which was designed for truckers and is presumably going to tell him when he's on a roadway that is not legal for trucks -- and it didn't tell him then he would have a major b**ch with Garmin.
    https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=275&pID=93853
    "With detailed maps providing turn-by-turn directions that speak street names, dēzl 560LMT provides specialized routing to support truck-related restrictions in both the U.S. and Canada (customizable by height, weight, length, width and hazardous materials). Simply enter dimensions and load restrictions, and dēzl 560LMT guides you according to your requirements."

    .
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