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Would you use your new iPhone 3G S as your only GPS?

PND4ME 0 Points
edited November -1 in Smartphone Navigation
Since TomTom is coming out with the turn by turn navigation software app for iPhone, how many of you that own iPhone will start using this new feature with your new iPhone 3G / 3G S?
Use it as a backup or everyday use?
Just wondering since the few people I talked to appears to like this idea of not having to carry or buy another PND when they already own an iPhone 3G / 3G S.

Comments

  • Boyd 1985 Points
    AFAIK, you won't need an iPhone 3Gs for TomTom; I think it runs on the 3g phone too. For that matter, if the cradle has a GPS in it, will it even work on the original phone?

    I love my iPhone, but have no interest whatsoever in using it for auto navigation. Screen is too small for that IMO. And the prices I seen discussed for the TomTom app with cradle don't seem to offer much incentive to buy it instead of a dedicated device.
  • PND4ME 0 Points
    AFAIK, you won't need an iPhone 3Gs for TomTom; I think it runs on the 3g phone too. For that matter, if the cradle has a GPS in it, will it even work on the original phone?

    I love my iPhone, but have no interest whatsoever in using it for auto navigation. Screen is too small for that IMO. And the prices I seen discussed for the TomTom app with cradle don't seem to offer much incentive to buy it instead of a dedicated device.
    I think you forgot the advantage of having the TomTom cradle that allow your iPhone to be charged at the same time offering louder volume output from your iPhone.

    I own a Cad Escalade that have NO BT ability and I hardly can hear the iPhone while driving using it's speaker.
    My wife have a Parrot MKi9200 that I paid over $200 for plus installation.
    I think the TomTom iPhone docking station will be a great add on for my vehicle. I have OEM GPS and I test other devices, using the iPhone 3G S with TomTom turn by turn application will keep me from mounting a TomTom device for comparison testing also. The reason I say use the iPhone 3G S, the phone processing speed is considerably faster than just the 3G and for navigation, you want to have a fast processor.
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    I think you forgot the advantage of having the TomTom cradle that allow your iPhone to be charged at the same time offering louder volume output from your iPhone.
    This is a good example of how we all have different priorities. :) Here in NJ, when they passed the cellphone law, I took that as a good excuse to just turn off my phone in the car and enjoy the ride with some music or radio. I have a very long (50 mile each way) commute, and this has been great for me. You're just gonna get voicemail if you call when I'm in the car.

    I also don't use voice guidance - another one of my quirks I'm sure. I just have a problem with some computer voice telling me what to do. :lol:

    So, in my case, the cradle doesn't do much and seems rather expensive for what it is. What is most important to me is a nice, big bright screen. Happily, there are lots of different models to choose from so we can all match the hardware to our personal tastes.

    But don't get me wrong, I think it's great that turn by turn nav is finally coming to the iPhone, it's long overdue and will be a great solution for lots of people. If I traveled a lot for business, as I did a few years ago, I would probably find it a great solution for rental cars.
  • PND4ME 0 Points
    I also enjoy is the pedestrian mode ability of the iPhone. For a small / light device, this is perfect to get you to the final destination after you parked your vehicle.
  • patruns 10 Points
    I already have this on my Nokia, but I will not use it in the car. It's good for pedestrian mode though..........
  • Mark29 0 Points
    I wouldn't but for different reasons. I like the iPhone, but I'll not own one due to additional data costs. But I also wouldn't use it for a gps due to the small screen size. I've gotten very used to the large screen on my TomTom 920.

    The merging of cell phones with PDA functionality makes perfect sense, unfortunately the cell phone companies think this gives them an excuse to force additional fees on users.

    Mark
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    unfortunately the cell phone companies think this gives them an excuse to force additional fees on users.
    I have unlimited access to the internet with a browser, can get e-mail from three different accounts and use a wide range of internet enabled applications over a relatively fast 3g network. I don't see how I am having additional fees "forced" on me. Should AT&T operate as a charity? IMO, $30 is not unreasonable for unlimited data service.

    Do I wish it were cheaper? Sure! But I understood the costs before signing up. Of course it isn't for everyone though. Hopefully these costs will drop as competition heats up and other carriers build up their networks.
  • PND4ME 0 Points
    I think there is rumor about new service provider by the end of the year besides AT&T for Apple iPhones. So I also know AT&T is waiving a lot of the wait period to lock their customers down to another 2 years.
    I just got my 3G S when my contract is not up yet with AT&T, they waived all the fees and signed me up anyway.

    I think Apple iPhone is great for a back up all around product, but I also think a lot of people will start to use this new iPhone as their only cell phone, emails, GPS, web, audio player and camera / video device.
  • Mark29 0 Points
    unfortunately the cell phone companies think this gives them an excuse to force additional fees on users.


    I have unlimited access to the internet with a browser, can get e-mail from three different accounts and use a wide range of internet enabled applications over a relatively fast 3g network. I don't see how I am having additional fees "forced" on me. Should AT&T operate as a charity? IMO, $30 is not unreasonable for unlimited data service.
    I'm not saying AT&T should offer something for nothing, but they're offering everything. It is forcing it if it's not something I need. I already pay for internet/cable/phone through Verizon at home. I don't have a need for 24/7 access to the internet everywhere. What I really would like is a merged device, but w/o internet/e-mail access. So for MY needs, yes it is a forced fee. I don't understand why it's so difficult to offer the device with voice-only service and a pay-as-you-go, or turned off data plan. Free or low-cost wi-fi is available at enough places for me; the only time I really desire 'net/e-mail access is when I travel, and nearly every US hotel offers it for free along with most airports.

    Do I wish it were cheaper? Sure! But I understood the costs before signing up. Of course it isn't for everyone though. Hopefully these costs will drop as competition heats up and other carriers build up their networks.
    I understand the costs too, that's why I'm waiting for fees to drop :D
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    edited July 2009
    Following a sudden spate of reports of 3GS overheating problems, Apple has posted some guidelines such as operation between 32 and 95 degrees, never store them where the temperature can exceed 113 and then this little bit of Apple advice:

    Don't leave your iPhone in direct sunlight for any extended period of time-Avoid using data intensive applications, like GPS or streaming-media apps, for extended periods of time on hot days or while in direct sunlight.

    A related story here: http://www.infoworld.com/d/mobilize/will-overheating-prompt-iphone-3g-s-recall-415?source=fssr
  • PND4ME 0 Points
    Following a sudden spate of reports of 3GS overheating problems, Apple has posted some guidelines such as operation between 32 and 95 degrees, never store them where the temperature can exceed 113 and then this little bit of Apple advice:

    Don't leave your iPhone in direct sunlight for any extended period of time-Avoid using data intensive applications, like GPS or streaming-media apps, for extended periods of time on hot days or while in direct sunlight.
    Thanks for the heads up Gator! I think Apple needs to come up with a dash mount with a fan on it to cool it down! Another opportunity for Apple to cash in on some accessories. The GPS works well in my car sitting on the console or visor which does not get as hot as it would if it is sitting on the dash. Having it as a back up is nice.
  • Tim 1481 Points
    Following a sudden spate of reports of 3GS overheating problems, Apple has posted some guideline
    That isn't quite right... the data in that article isn't "new". It applied back when the 3G was released, and really the document was just updated to include the new 3G S. I pulled out the docs that came with my iPhone 3G purchased a year ago, and the safe temp language is the same. I even pulled out my original 2G iphone docs and it too has the same language.

    iPhone heat issue much ado about nothing
  • PND4ME 0 Points
    Following a sudden spate of reports of 3GS overheating problems, Apple has posted some guideline

    That isn't quite right... the data in that article isn't "new". It applied back when the 3G was released, and really the document was just updated to include the new 3G S. I pulled out the docs that came with my iPhone 3G purchased a year ago, and the safe temp language is the same. I even pulled out my original 2G iphone docs and it too has the same language.

    Thanks Tim, I think that since these processors is being taxed even more with the turn by turn navigation application that it will cause the unit to build more heat than using it only as a cell. We should soon find out I guess.
    TomTom Turn by Turn nav application at $10 a month is kind of steep considering you can buy on for less than $150? TeleNav have the same type of offering. I guess they have to split the profit with Apple and AT&T.
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    I have used my iPhone 3G continously tracking my position with Google maps, and after a half hour it got quite hot. Also noticed that even though it was plugged into a car charger, the battery level dropped slightly.

    Now this was quite awhile ago however, and there have been two software updates since then. Seems to me that these issues were addressed in the updates to some extent. But it does make me wonder about turn by turn apps. Apple has crammed a lot of stuff into a very small package, so it doesn't surprise me that heat is an issue.
  • Tim 1481 Points
    Right-- there is no doubt that continuous use of the GPS in the iPhone makes it run hotter than when used for something like talking. Although both of mine get hot while on long calls as well. I used the TeleNav app on my iPhone for 4 hours straight the other day... it was certainly toasty but not burn your fingers hot.

    As to the price, $10/month for AT&T Navigator (aka TeleNav) is pretty much the standard price for phone based navigation apps. That's what it is on most other platforms. Due to the abundance of free and $0.99 apps on the App Store I think people expected they would get navigation at a discount for some reason.

    $10/month for TeleNav sounds like a lot, but when you factor in that it essentially comes with "free" map updates, "free" traffic reporting and "free" connected POI search then the value begins to show.

    To purchase a PND with a map and traffic subscription (even a "free" ad supported traffic) is probably a comparable price. Here are some quick numbers.

    An iPhone gives a 3.5" screen, so let's take a Nuvi 265T at $175. Add in a lifetime map subscription for $99. Our total cost is $275.

    For that price, you can get about over two years of TeleNav service on the iPhone. I'm not saying the TeleNav service is a better deal, but it doesn't look all that expensive compared to a PND plus maps and traffic. The iPhone screen isn't as good with glare and doesn't come with a mount, but does have the convenience of a "single device" and you get other GPS "connected" features like send-to-GPS and connected POI searches.
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    The only thing I was trying to point out is that the iPhones, and perhaps the 3GS more than others, may get easily overheated in areas of the South and Southwest if trying to depend on it as a navigator for very long periods, especially summertime travel. But thanks Tim for pointing out it's not a new issue with the 3GS. Perhaps the sudden complaints are from new owners who weren't already aware of the heat the iPhone can generate.
  • PND4ME 0 Points
    The only thing I was trying to point out is that the iPhones, and perhaps the 3GS more than others, may get easily overheated in areas of the South and Southwest if trying to depend on it as a navigator for very long periods, especially summertime travel. But thanks Tim for pointing out it's not a new issue with the 3GS. Perhaps the sudden complaints are from new owners who weren't already aware of the heat the iPhone can generate.
    I use a protective Otter box case which probably not the best thing for heat, but I do not feel the heat because of the box / cover. I do not set my on top of the dash infact I would recommend if you are going to use the iPhone for turn by turn navigation device, you might consider a vent mount option and use the AC if it is hot, that may resolve some of the issue with heat.
    NavMan used to put out some heat also, nothing caugh on fire thank GOD.
  • Tim 1481 Points
    Perhaps the sudden complaints are from new owners who weren't already aware of the heat the iPhone can generate.
    I think you've nailed it.
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    Somewhat related, a user at another site is already running app V3.1 and reports much improved battery life:

    Very. happy to report that 3.1 has for me at least resulted in the kind of battery life I'd been hoping for.

    In fact it is so much better that whereas I'd become to plugging it in whenever it wasn't used, I am now continually surprised at the level of charge it still retains.
  • So where the heck is the TomTom app?
  • Tim 1481 Points
    They've only said it would be out "later this summer".
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    One of the review sites (think it was one of the Mac ones) indicated that pricing would be announced in August, but actual release date wasn't mentioned in the same article. Could be at the same time as pricing announced, or perhaps a bit later. Who knows. Also saw mention in the same article that the Navigon app will be available for the US this month. Didn't locate the original article right off, so going by memory.
  • Tim 1481 Points
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    I also noticed Apple approved an app for the iPhone that searches for medical marijuana poi's. The app name? Cannabis.

    Think that will sell a few copies in California and Oregon. How about a review of how well that app works Tim? :mrgreen:
  • Tim 1481 Points
    I am in Los Angeles right now. I was watching the news and one of those stores caught fire. Does the app get a passing grade if it does, or does not find where the store was?
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    Did they have a large crowd outside the store? :shock:

    How many needed to be treated for smoke-inhalation?
  • Tim 1481 Points
    I didn't pay that close attention. :roll:
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    Rumors still rampant that the iPhone or perhaps the iTablet is coming to Verizon in 2010. Negotiations between the two have been pretty widely reported. And now Verizon is pulling out all the stops to start introducing their 4G network early next year? And if it's the tablet, could the iPhone be far behind? Yeah, I know the current phone won't run on a CDMA network. But changing a little hardware to take advantage of a fast and very reliable network with the 80 million plus subscribers that go with it sure makes it look worthwhile.
  • Tim 1481 Points
    I think it is highly likely the iPhone will be on Verizon within a year.
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    Meanwhile, AT&T is thinking about what to do next when their exclusive agreement expires...

    http://bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=a52nRZKGgXOM
    Aug. 10 (Bloomberg) -- AT&T Inc. says there will be life after the iPhone.

    As time ticks down on the biggest U.S. phone company’s exclusive rights to carry the Apple Inc. device, it is looking beyond mobile phones for growth. The company’s next bet may be a camera, electronic-book reader or dog-tracking collar, executives of its wireless unit said in interviews last week.
    A dog tracking collar??? :roll:
    Verizon Wireless Chief Executive Officer Lowell McAdam said last month there is a “very good possibility” his company will offer an Apple device on its newest, fastest network technology, known as Long-Term Evolution, or LTE. Basking Ridge, New Jersey- based Verizon Wireless has said it will start offering service on the LTE network by next year. McAdam declined to comment on a deal before that or say what the device will be.
  • mvl 191 Points
    With the convergence of smartfones and GPSs, I'm starting to keep an eye on the FCC site again.

    So far no CDMA nor LTE device from Apple has been posted. Usually there are carrier/manufacturer test conducted for up to a year, then an FCC approval, then a release at least 3-6 months afterwards. So it'll be a little bit at least before the iPhone/iTablet on Verizon.

    I remember Mac leak a few months back about Apple ordering tons of 8-inch (maybe) touch screens from a supplier, so that could be the iTablet in the works.

    It makes sense that Apple will release an LTE device on Verizon. Verizon plans to pilot 2 cities in the US by end of year, with full LTE rollout completed by end of 2010. They need a killer app / killer device like iTablet to recoup that investment. Then Verizon/Apple could extend that exclusive to the global Vodafone network when Vodafone rolls out LTE in 2011/2012.

    LTE (read FIOS-speeds over wireless) seems like a logical fit for the media-heavy needs of iPhone/Mac users.

    There was an old article that said Apple actually approached Verizon first for the iPhone. At the time Verizon was the only real quality business cell carrier. The deal eventually broke off because Apple wanted too high a cut of the iPhone data revenue, and Verizon wanted too high a cut of the app store revenue.

    I'm sure Verizon is changing their tune. The iPhone turned Cingular from a hated carrier that was bleeding customers, to a formidable Verizon competitor.
  • Tim 1481 Points
    Usually there are carrier/manufacturer test conducted for up to a year, then an FCC approval, then a release at least 3-6 months afterwards. So it'll be a little bit at least before the iPhone/iTablet on Verizon.
    I agree it will likely be several months away at best, however Apple and other companies are getting good at the FCC game. Approvals often don't hit the site until sometimes just a few weeks before the product goes to market.
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    With the convergence of smartfones and GPSs, I'm starting to keep an eye on the FCC site again.
    I hope you are also keeping your eyes peeled for that dog tracking collar from AT&T! :lol:

    If Apple just added a GPS chip to the iPod Touch I'll bet they could grab some more PND share very easily using the TomTom and Navigon apps.
  • mvl 191 Points
    With the convergence of smartfones and GPSs, I'm starting to keep an eye on the FCC site again.


    I hope you are also keeping your eyes peeled for that dog tracking collar from AT&T! :lol:

    If Apple just added a GPS chip to the iPod Touch I'll bet they could grab some more PND share very easily using the TomTom and Navigon apps.
    I'll look out for the dog collar..

    Once the AT&T exclusive expires, I'm hoping Apple removes the bluetooth-data-block on the Touch. I'd buy a Touch to replace my aging developer-abandoned Palm TX right away.
  • Tim 1481 Points
    I hope you are also keeping your eyes peeled for that dog tracking collar from AT&T! :lol:
    IMHO, that product actually makes quite a bit of sense. They've got the communications technology, just take the keyboard and screen out of a phone, give it a decent GPS, and tack on another fee to the customer's existing account.
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    Waddya know. . . You can run an iPhone on the Verizon network.

  • Tim 1481 Points
    Yeah, well, not exactly. :)
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    Well, at least kinda sorta 8)
  • mvl 191 Points
    That shows you:

    1) how much some people hate AT&T, and the lengths they'll go to to keep a non-AT&T iPhone
    2) The downside of being a walled garden customer. AT&T doesn't want to swamp its network, so it tells Apple to disable high bandwidth features.

    Of course the upside is that a walled garden makes piracy much more difficult, and thus makes the Apple app store much more attractive for developers. I think piracy is why Tomtom abandoned Navigator software in the first place, and why they are only reentering the American Navigator market via the iPhone.

    I had considered creating and selling an immigration app for the Symbian system (target market is non-American customers), but decided that Symbian has too weak an anti-piracy toolkit. So my app (when I get time to built it) will be a subscription-based wap one.
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    Well, at least kinda sorta 8)
    Sorry Gator, not even kinda sorta in my book. :)

    If you use that kind of "logic", I already use my iPhone on Verizon since I have Verizon DSL and wifi at home and work. It's not a "phone" when you're using wifi, just an internet device. No phone calls. No SMS. No voicemail. Basically you have an iPod Touch.

    Actually that is one of my beefs with AT&T, why not let us do all that with a wifi connection? It would lower the load on their own network. I don't get a usable cell signal at home and this would really help me.

    But regardless - that video is ridiculous. Even if you like the concept, the monthly data costs are unbelievable, and the guy said it was slower than AT&T 3g.
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    Go ahead and rain on my parade, Boyd.


    Just kidding of course. You're pretty much right, and it's nothing I'd advocate. But it does show some of the benefits of using a wifi connection and/or the limitations imposed by ATT/Apple.
  • Tim 1481 Points
    But it does show some of the benefits of using a wifi connection and/or the limitations imposed by ATT/Apple.
    I certainly don't disagree that there are ridiculous limitations imposed by Apple and AT&T. But that Verizon device doesn't really let you get around them in an effective way. They cited two restrictions that could be bypassed... Joost and large app store downloads. Joost is a video player and requires a fast connection. So it is going to be slow over Verizon's data network. Likewise the reason you can't download some large apps from the app store over the AT&T network is because they are large and would just take too long over 3G.

    AT&T's coverage is crap for many people-- no doubt about that. This device will help. But don't forget while the iPhone will think it is connected to wifi you are still on the Verizon data network and won't have wifi speeds. All you are really doing is switching from AT&T's data network (good speed, crappy coverage) to Verizon's data network (better coverage).
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    Also - it's nice to have Skype on the iPhone, but my enthusiasm faded quickly when I learned the restrictions. Putting aside the issue of not working over the cell network, it's an application and cannot run in the background. So it's pretty much limited to outgoing calls. It can only accept an incoming call while the application is running, and the phone goes to sleep and shuts it down after a period of inactivity.

    Also, if you receive a phone call or text message during a Skype call, it dumps you out of the application. I have not tried the new version, so maybe some of this has changed but I doubt it because these are limitations which Apple places on all 3rd party apps.

    It certainly has its uses though - a friend was working in Eastern Europe for a couple weeks and called everyone back home using Skype on his iPhone at wifi hotspots.
  • Tim 1481 Points
    Yes, the no background apps restriction comes into play heavily with Skype. I've used the Skype app quite a few times and I was very impressed with the audio quality. Blown away, really. It was better audio quality than using the phone part of the iPhone.
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