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TomTom HD Flow and HD Route Times (Europe)

Tim 1480 Points
edited November -1 in TomTom Car Forum
TomTom Expands Availability of Live Road Condition Information with HD Flow and HD Route Times Products

New, Innovative Solutions, Based on TomTom HD Traffic™ Technology, Deliver Detailed Real-Time Traffic Insight to Facilitate Government Infrastructural Decisions and to Enhance Road Construction and Mobility Management Solutions

AMSTERDAM--TomTom, the world’s leading provider of location and navigation solutions, launched two new traffic solutions designed to help government agencies better manage traffic flows and to enable them to provide better traffic information to the public. HD Flow and HD Route Times are based on TomTom’s High Definition Traffic™ technology, an advanced service for TomTom end users that delivers up-to-the-minute, detailed incident reports about the length and reason for delays, the most accurate delay information, travel and arrival times and alternative route proposals.
“TomTom is the authority in traffic information with a strong history of providing up-to-date and accurate traffic information to consumers”, said Anne van Houwelingen, Senior Vice President of Mobility Solutions at TomTom. “These two new solutions build on our expertise and are ideal for systems designed to provide travel times on alternative routes for optimal routing and traffic flow efficiency during road work. In addition, government institutions and road construction and mobility managers can leverage the precise real-time information to gain better control of their road networks and keep drivers fully informed along the way on a day-to-day basis.”
HD Flow

HD Flow delivers a real-time, highly detailed view of how all traffic is flowing on the road network delivered in European standards including DATEX2/TMC/XML to ensure easy integration into existing systems. Governments can integrate this real-time flow information into their traffic control centres to better monitor road network traffic and see the effects of traffic management directly on all motorways and secondary roads.

HD Route Times

HD Route Times is a turnkey solution providing precise, real-time travel and delay times for all possible routes, giving governments the dynamic information needed to update variable messaging signs (VMS) along key routes. As the data is updated every minute, drivers are provided with insight into which route is fastest at any given moment and can help drivers select the faster routes, which in turn optimises traffic flow.

Both HD Flow and HD Route Times combine information from GSM and GPS devices and use a unique fusion technique to deliver much more precise travel time information than previously available through alternate methods. Real-time speeds are provided on all motorways and secondary roads, giving the most accurate view of the traffic situation across the entire road network. Both products are quick and cost efficient to implement. As they do not require additional infrastructure or hardware installations, they do not cause subsequent road closures that could disrupt traffic flow and they are environmentally friendly.

HD Flow and HD Route Times are now available for government entities with initial coverage available for Germany, the Netherlands and Switzerland for all motorways and secondary roads. Coverage for additional countries is scheduled to be added in the course of 2010. Cross border traffic information is also included in the offerings.

How TomTom HD Products are Developed

HD Traffic, HD Flow and HD Route Times contain up-to-the-minute information from multiple data sources, including anonymous GPS measurements from connected personal navigation devices, connected fleet GPS devices and mobile phone signals, road sensors and journalistic data. Using proprietary and tested methods, TomTom dynamically merges this information and makes it available in real time to industry customers in the personal navigation, cell phone, fleet management, government and in-vehicle markets. HD Solutions can be incorporated into navigation solution or routing tools to help drivers be automatically rerouted around jams and potentially save time and money, minimize environmental impact, and enjoy a significantly improved navigation experience.

Comments

  • dhn 336 Points
    Thanks for that information.

    Do you think the infrastructure is not in place for HD to ever get to the States?
  • Tim 1480 Points
    Do you think the infrastructure is not in place for HD to ever get to the States?
    I know some people will disagree with me about this, and that's okay. :) But here goes.

    I think if TomTom wanted to build an HD product in North America today, from a technical perspective it would be very easy to deploy. However what they don't have here in North America is enough data (i.e. probes) to make the data any better than the existing data coming from Inrix, TrafficCast, AirSage, etc.

    Some people believe that you can make a traffic data point through just one probe-- I don't. There are too many exceptions to why a single vehicle might be traveling at a particular speed.

    I think AirSage might be a good example. They have Sprint and Verizon customers in the USA available as probes which dwarf the amount of probes TomTom has in their LIVE models. Yet while the AirSage data looks really nice, nobody seems to be saying it is significantly better than Inrix data or Navteq Traffic data.

    The most likely scenario of HD Traffic coming to North America would be for TomTom to partner with an existing traffic data provider and rebrand the data.
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    I would not be one of those people to disagree with you. :)
  • Tim 1480 Points
    Nope, not on this one. :)
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    Nope, not on this one. :)
    LOL!
  • infama 0 Points
    Do you think the infrastructure is not in place for HD to ever get to the States?

    I know some people will disagree with me about this, and that's okay. :) But here goes.

    I think if TomTom wanted to build an HD product in North America today, from a technical perspective it would be very easy to deploy. However what they don't have here in North America is enough data (i.e. probes) to make the data any better than the existing data coming from Inrix, TrafficCast, AirSage, etc.

    Some people believe that you can make a traffic data point through just one probe-- I don't. There are too many exceptions to why a single vehicle might be traveling at a particular speed.

    I think AirSage might be a good example. They have Sprint and Verizon customers in the USA available as probes which dwarf the amount of probes TomTom has in their LIVE models. Yet while the AirSage data looks really nice, nobody seems to be saying it is significantly better than Inrix data or Navteq Traffic data.

    The most likely scenario of HD Traffic coming to North America would be for TomTom to partner with an existing traffic data provider and rebrand the data.
    North Am is just too big geographically. A Dash type solution seems to be the best approach. However to get the scale needed, it needs to be a joint venture between TT and Garmin. It would need to be an add on service, not a compet advantage.
  • mvl 191 Points
    I think AirSage might be a good example. They have Sprint and Verizon customers in the USA available as probes which dwarf the amount of probes TomTom has in their LIVE models. Yet while the AirSage data looks really nice, nobody seems to be saying it is significantly better than Inrix data or Navteq Traffic data.
    If course I have to disagree :)

    I think the difference here is IQroutes. Cell phones are definitely insufficient to cover the speeds of free-flowing traffic, as there would be far too few cars especially on sideroads. But IQroutes already covers all free-flow roads perfectly (except for the <10mph bug).

    When there is a real-time jam, cell probes should be more than enough to cover them. Verizon or Sprint are in at least 1 in 3 cars on the road (if not 1 in 2). And there are well over 15 cars in each jam, so there's at least 5 probes always for variances to IQroutes.

    Seems more than enough to trigger trustworthy alerts to me.
  • Probes that use cell positioning require gps based probes for verification because they are off by a certain percentage that is considered more than negligible.

    OTOH none of the existing gps probe based traffic providers is yet close to critical mass which requires 5 million or more.

    If TomTom was smart and had the cash (they don't) they'd simply buy AirSage and sign some fleet deals and come out with TomTom Routes on the Iphone for more probes. They apparently have the infrastructure in place to do this and the expertise its just the cash. They did Europe one tiny country after another. The US would be a huge rollout in comparison.

    I agree that they will just rebrand and use someone else's data throwing in whatever they have also. I actually look for the TrafficCast Dynaflow 3.0 to be that product maybe mixed with AirSage once they integrate Verizons data which is taking them some time. They have been down for over 2 months now.

    Of course they will have to spin this properly in order not to lose face.
    Do you think the infrastructure is not in place for HD to ever get to the States?

    I know some people will disagree with me about this, and that's okay. :) But here goes.

    I think if TomTom wanted to build an HD product in North America today, from a technical perspective it would be very easy to deploy. However what they don't have here in North America is enough data (i.e. probes) to make the data any better than the existing data coming from Inrix, TrafficCast, AirSage, etc.

    Some people believe that you can make a traffic data point through just one probe-- I don't. There are too many exceptions to why a single vehicle might be traveling at a particular speed.

    I think AirSage might be a good example. They have Sprint and Verizon customers in the USA available as probes which dwarf the amount of probes TomTom has in their LIVE models. Yet while the AirSage data looks really nice, nobody seems to be saying it is significantly better than Inrix data or Navteq Traffic data.

    The most likely scenario of HD Traffic coming to North America would be for TomTom to partner with an existing traffic data provider and rebrand the data.
  • mvl 191 Points
    Probes that use cell positioning require gps based probes for verification because they are off by a certain percentage that is considered more than negligible.
    When Verizon implemented E-911 years back, they were the only carrier to not implement tower-triangulation for E-911. They instead installed GPSs on all their phones.

    So Verizon/Airsage should be good enough data.

    I'm still hoping the GO1000's American equivalent has an LTE chip, so it can run on Verizon 4G.

    I still believe there's an intellectual property constraint on HD traffic, that is requiring Vodafone (or a voda affiliate like Verizon) to be the provider on all HD traffic implementations.

    I was shocked when Tomtom signed with Jaspar, but I'm guessing that was just a bandaid until Verizon 4G with SIM cards launched.
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    A broad availability of Verizons LTE/4G network is still over a year out tho.
  • mvl 191 Points
    30 markets by the end of 2010, just in time for a shiny new NC10 model:
    http://news.vzw.com/LTE/Overview.html

    And what's even more promising is that Boston has been a pilot city that's been live since August 2009. So Tomtom employees in North American Headquarters (Concord, Massachusetts) could be testing HD traffic as we speak.

    I just listened to the youtube video, and Dick Lynch (Verizon CTO) said "we see LTE devices embedded in vehicles, we seem them embedded in appliances, we see them embedded in consumer electronics..." Interesting that he said "vehicles" at the top of his list :)
  • gatorguy 326 Points
    There's always hope :)
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