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Droid X means no more stand alone GPS navigation system

Spyder63 331 Points
Probably not the politically correct forum for this post, but I thought Motonav users might find it interesting that Motorola is competing with itself.

The suction cup mount looks familiar.

A quote from Navigadget: "If Droid X won’t replace the stand alone GPS
navigation system in your vehicle then we don’t know what will. Motorola must know this too so they even announced a car mount for the Droid X right away. "

http://www.navigadget.com/index.php/2010/06/25/droid-x-means-no-more-stand-alone-gps-navigation-system

Comments

  • Very interesting, and it certainly makes marketing sense, following the path of "your phone can do everything" (if not very well).

    I thought this interesting as well-

    "Droid X has a 4.3″ touch screen display with 854×480 resolution..."

    That's very close to the Motonav aspect and pixel config. Makes sense that they would run the same nav software. That being the case, is our 765T just a pared down, no-phone version of the Droid inside? That may explain why it calcs so incredibly fast! Good processor horsepower!
  • Spyder63 331 Points
    Garmin did it with their early, unsold nuviphones. Turned them into the nuvi 295w. No phone in there, but an interesting gps and essentially in the old nuviphone case.


    https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=134&pID=73079
  • Spyder63 331 Points
    Another interesting predicament seems to be surfacing: Gatorguy posted the following.....

    "Massachusetts has passed a law banning ALL use of navigation on a cellphone while driving, even if it's being used hands-free. It's part of a "no-texting" law just signed. All the provisions in the bill take effect in 90 days, or in early October. "

    Check out the entire thread here: Mass. bans phone GPS use
  • Well now. I guess Massachusettes won't be using the Droid nav, now will they! :shock:
  • Spyder63 331 Points
    Next they'll try to ban OnStar because you have to push a button to activate. How does Ford Sync activate, anybody know? Interesting that stand alone PNDs are not banned yet, but TT has their US HQ in Mass. Next they will go for in-dash units. The industry lobbyists must be seeing $$$$ right now.
  • mvl 191 Points
    A quote from Navigadget: "If Droid X won’t replace the stand alone GPS
    navigation system in your vehicle then we don’t know what will. Motorola must know this too so they even announced a car mount for the Droid X right away. "
    I have an entirely different opinion.

    Smartphone GPS is a novelty that sells more phones, and introduces more people to navigation, but it's the absolute worst type of navigation device.

    1) PNDs win as the "discount" option for urbanites who can't or don't want to spend the $30/month fee for owning a Droid X.

    2) PNDs win as the reliable option for those who don't live in cities and need something with onboard maps for the inevitable suburban/rural coverage gap.

    3) PNDs win for those who want intelligent routing like Tomtom's IQroutes/LIVE traffic.

    The only place that smartphones win are for walkers and mass-transit users.

    I still feel in-dash > PND > smartphone for navigation. And in 3-4 years PND will merge with a MID and it will become in-dash > MID > smartphone for navigation.
  • A quote from Navigadget: "If Droid X won’t replace the stand alone GPS
    navigation system in your vehicle then we don’t know what will. Motorola must know this too so they even announced a car mount for the Droid X right away. "


    I have an entirely different opinion.

    Smartphone GPS is a novelty that sells more phones, and introduces more people to navigation, but it's the absolute worst type of navigation device.

    1) PNDs win as the "discount" option for urbanites who can't or don't want to spend the $30/month fee for owning a Droid X.

    2) PNDs win as the reliable option for those who don't live in cities and need something with onboard maps for the inevitable suburban/rural coverage gap.

    3) PNDs win for those who want intelligent routing like Tomtom's IQroutes/LIVE traffic.

    The only place that smartphones win are for walkers and mass-transit users.

    I still feel in-dash > PND > smartphone for navigation. And in 3-4 years PND will merge with a MID and it will become in-dash > MID > smartphone for navigation.
    Very interesting! I have to say, I agree with most everything you mentioned. The only area where I differ is on the in-dash systems vs. PND.

    Having had numerous in-dash systems in the past, this is what I've observed:

    While they certainly look more "finished/polished" and usually offer a larger screen and more integrated features (out of the box, that is), the cost for me now seems ridiculous, compared to what you can pay for a great PND. Furthermore, map updates on the in-dash units are as much $$$ as a new PND! That, in itself, kept me from getting the in-dash in the last two vehicles I purchased. Finally, I've noticed that the 3-D view has always been significantly better on PND's vs. in dash. Can't understand why, since you could put a whole PC in the in-dash unit! This may have changed, but as of a year and a half ago, I wasn't impressed.

    Until these issues are addressed, I believe that the average American will continue to go for the lower cost/lower cost of ownership PND.

    But still, I believe you're spot on with your feelings about the whole phone-based nav thing. :wink:
  • rayt435 5 Points
    Until these issues are addressed, I believe that the average American will continue to go for the lower cost/lower cost of ownership PND.
    Plus a PND can be moved from vehicle to vehicle which is very difficult when the system is builtin to the vehicle.
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