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GPS #5 - How many dedicated GPS units have you owned?

imshouting 0 Points
edited November -1 in GPS Discussions
Hi folks,

I remember back in around 2004 i bought my first GPS. I use the term loosely because it was a PDA with a GPS antenna on it, which had a GPS ap and worked fairly well. It was a Mio Digiwalker and was pretty cool for its time. It was pretty new to me back then and did the job. I still have it now, and should take a pic but i forget where it is. I then updated to a real GPS which i bought in around 2005. I can't recall exactly what model it was but it was a Garmin with a 4:3 screen, probably 4 inches wide maximum. I Paid $799 AUD for it at the time (lol) and it was brilliant. It calculated/recalculated very quickly, wasn't too bad at picking up satellites and was accurate enough. Had a responsive screen too. Then one day in 2007 we used valet parking at a brief hotel stay in the city. You can guess what happened next. The hotel wiped their hands of it. The incident was reported but basically my $799 went down the drain.

I stuck with the brand i loved, and got another Garmin, a 260W. I only paid $299 AUD this time and it made having the old unit stolen even harder to take. I still have it now and to say i hate it is an understatement. Its screen is crap in comparison, you basically have to perforate the touchscreen to get it to respond, it sometimes takes 20 minutes to pick up satellites on clear days and sends you the wrong way for several KM before the dreaded "recalculating" kicks in, realising you were meant to be going down a completely different road. It's also tried to send us down dead-ends, and taken us on short-cuts which end up being basically someone's private rural-driveway.

Nonetheless we've had use for our money elsewhere up until recently so it wasn't a priority but last night i saw an ad for the run-out model Garmin Nuvi 50 for $98 AUD. So i bought it after a few reviews. It's fantastic. 5 inch screen, current speed overlay with elevation, compass etc, current speedzone, speed camera warnings (which there are a LOT of in this state/country) and so on. The satellite reception is almost instantaneous and it re-calculates very quickly, and is very accurate. I also love the lane-guidance warnings it shows. I bought it for the wife and hew new little Kia Rio (which loses the sat-nav feature the US/CA gets). But i'm so impressed with the new range of Nuvi's that i'm picking up a Nuvi 2595LMT tonight for my car. My car is older and has no BT so that'll be good for me, along with the voice commands, and lifetime map/traffic updates included.

So it's a 'relatively' happy Garmin family here, and while they have their glitches/downsides they're all in all a great product.

So not including phones/tablets etc, how many GPS' have you owned?

Comments

  • babj615 41 Points
    edited June 2012
    Back around 2002 (?) I remember using a symbol CF GPS receiver (still have it) with my iPAQ pocket PC running one of the best (and one of my all time favorite) GPS applications, Mapopolis.

    The software was pretty revolutionary, for its time.

    Since then, I can not count how many GPS I have owned, even removing all phones.

    Current primary unit is Montana 650. Also use/play with a 3790, Oregon 550t, 450, 300, Dakota 20, and once in awhile (to remind me why I love my Garmins so much) a Lowrance Endura Safari.
  • that's a hell of a lot of GPS'!

    the features you get for the $ spent these days certainly has increased quite a bit, as with most technology
  • Boyd 1966 Points
    How many GPS have I owned? Way too many!

    My first was a DeLorme EarthMate receiver that I connected to my Macintosh PowerBook in 2000. But first dedicated unit was Magellan Meridian Gold handheld that I got in 2002. Then I got a Garmin Legend C in 2004, which was my first handheld with a color screen.

    First automotive unit was Garmin StreetPilot 2620 in 2004. After that, there were many others: Nuvi 650, TomTom GO 920t, Mio c520, Nuvi 5000, Nuvi 205, Oregon 400t, Magellan Maestro 5310, Magellan Roadmate 1700, Nuvi 1350t and Nuvi 3790t. Finally, a Montana 600 which is what I currently use both in the car and on foot.

    I think that all adds up to 15. Phew. What a long strange trip it's been. :D
  • Seldom 0 Points
    Not in Boyd's league. Married Garmin after I started making maps for my 60CSX. Generally a late adopter (REI sales) except for the two Etrex.

    Etrex Summit, 60CSX, OR300, 62S, Etrex30, nuvi 660, nuvi 1490.
  • sviking 141 Points

    Current primary unit is Montana 650. Also use/play with a 3790, Oregon 550t, 450, 300, Dakota 20, and once in awhile (to remind me why I love my Garmins so much) a Lowrance Endura Safari.
    Sorry, but I gotta ask... Why would you drop the coin on almost every Oregon...AND a Dakota?

    As for me, I started in '98 or so with a Lowrance Globalmap 100, then Magellan SporTrak Pro, then the Garmins hit. Streetpilot 2720, Nuvi 660, Nuvi 200 (gift for sister), 60 CSx, Nuvi 3790T and, as of a couple days ago...Montana 600. :D
  • babj615 41 Points

    Current primary unit is Montana 650. Also use/play with a 3790, Oregon 550t, 450, 300, Dakota 20, and once in awhile (to remind me why I love my Garmins so much) a Lowrance Endura Safari.


    Sorry, but I gotta ask... Why would you drop the coin on almost every Oregon...AND a Dakota?
    Sure thing.

    I purchased an Oregon 400t the weekend they were released, and had so many problem with it crashing or powering down just by gripping the device in my hands that it was exchanged four times before I gave it back, permanently.

    Fast forward a few months, and I came across a 300 on sale, so I gave the Oregon a second chance. This one was much better build quality, and served me well for awhile.

    Then my new GF (who loves her gadgets) had to one up me and get the 550t.

    Once I realized how much nicer the x50 were, I had to get a 450 for myself, which has served me pretty well also.

    Now I have moved up to the Montana, and will not be looking back, while my GF (who is pretty tiny at 4'10" and 90lbs) wanted something that fit her small hands better, thus the Dakota 20.

    The Dakota 20 fits her small hands like the Oregon fits my hands, and she likes it that way.

    As for the 3790, don't waste your money, the device is worthless. I have to make a call to Garmin today about that. I have had the unit replaced twice already, and still it will not do ANYTHING as advertised. Worst. Garmin. Ever.

    Aren't you glad you asked, now?
  • sviking 141 Points
    Now I have moved up to the Montana
    It really is such an awesome unit and I've only had it for 3 days. Haven't even been out on the trails with it, but I'm pretty sure I'm keeping it. I originally bought it from Amazon (30 day return policy) to play with and send back if I didn't like it. I did this when deciding between the 60CSx and Delorme PN-40. The Delorme went back.
    As for the 3790, don't waste your money, the device is worthless. I have to make a call to Garmin today about that. I have had the unit replaced twice already, and still it will not do ANYTHING as advertised. Worst. Garmin. Ever.
    Are you telling me to not waste my money on the 3790? Too late...had mine over a year now. And, it's a great auto unit. Big, beautiful screen, fast refresh rate, über cool form factor, etc. No problems at all with mine except that sometimes the screen will be a little slow to respond to an input. A hard shutdown/restart takes care of that for a while. But, a very minor point that really doesn't bother me that much at all. Sorry yours is the worst. Garmin .ever... I've never even heard anything like that said about the 3790 before.
  • Boyd 1966 Points
    As for the 3790, don't waste your money, the device is worthless.
    I'd say you just had bad luck, or maybe you have unreasonable expectations. I got a 3790 as soon as Amazon had them in stock - summer 2010. Never any real problems with it at all. It is still - by far - my favorite nuvi (see full list above). And I am not alone in this belief, one of our senior members here (who is also a mod at another popular GPS forum) was another early 3790 adopter has frequently said it's his favorite nuvi as well.
  • babj615 41 Points
    I will be posting my 3790 experience in a separate thread, so as not to muddy this one up.... Stay tuned!
  • Boyd 1966 Points
    Funny thing is, I was also an early Oregon 400t adopter. Never had a single problem with that unit either. It was my primary handheld GPS for over three years until I got the Montana, at which point I gave it to a friend who still uses it.
  • babj615 41 Points
    Funny thing is, I was also an early Oregon 400t adopter. Never had a single problem with that unit either. It was my primary handheld GPS for over three years until I got the Montana, at which point I gave it to a friend who still uses it.
    "Some guys have all the luck....." :?
  • Boyd 1966 Points
    I thought the expression was more like "Lucky with GPS, unlucky with love". :lol:
  • sviking 141 Points
    Funny thing is, I was also an early Oregon 400t adopter. Never had a single problem with that unit either.
    Sounds like he didn't even keep it long enough to try any firmware updates. Seems like Garmin released some good ones for the Oregon.
  • Boyd 1966 Points
    What I'm seeing on the Montana reminds me of the early days with the Oregon. Garmin kept adding new functions, which is something I had never seen on any of their other products. OTOH, some people might argue that they released it before the software was finished. :wink:
  • sviking 141 Points
    Glad I waited a year to get my Montana. Mine seems very stable. No lock-ups or anything else weird that I've found...yet...
  • I started with a Garmin 45xl. It was a big upgrade over the currently available 45 model. 8 sat receiver. Single channel though that scanned through the 8 sats. It was about 5 minutes waiting to lock on in the clear. A real PIA. But it worked good with my laptop and Delorme Street Atlas (i started with version 1 and moved up progressively as they released new versions). I could find places that gas station attendants didn't know about even ! lol
    I moved on to the Garmin 12 next. It was a 12 channel parallel receiver that would lock on much faster and could even keep the sats in modest tree cover. A real innovation at the time. I used it along with the 45 for mapping the trails in the winter and making up our trail maps. The first one I had to hold in my hand and keep it in the air all the time to receive enough satellites. Even then it would drop the lock regularly. I had to use early primitive software to reattach the tracks to ensure enough track points for a decent map.
    Next up was the Magelllan Sporttrack Topo . That one had built in 112meg of memory. A whopping amount at the time. And came with downloadable detailed topo maps. The built in map wasn't too bad but the detailed maps were better of course. I could load regions with it when I went someplace. It was a serial connection and very slow but functional. And it too was a 12 channel parallel receiver and the sensitivity of the receiver was improving nicely now in the newer models finally. I could even put this one in my top jacket pocket and keep a lock finally. It still would break at times and in dense tree cover it's not that great of course (unlike the new Montana which never seems to drop a lock). Around that time I decided that I was going to get a Ipaq. And I got a trial Tom Tom gps add on receiver to test as part of a feedback deal I made with the manufacturer. Tom tom was not a big player in the US at the time but was big over seas. So I managed to get one of those and tested the software for them for a year or so. After the first couple of releases it was ready and was working pretty good. I used it for work finding places that I had previously used my laptop Delorme software for and it was easily as good without all the fuss of the laptop. The Ipaq setup was really the first mapping program that had a decent enough screen size and had built in maps and directions. I used it for a while till I got the next one.
    Then I got the Magellan Crossover. It was the next best thing to the Montana. It had real maps on it for the time period and with it being both a woods gps and a street routing gps I was able to retire the Sportrak Topo. And the nice thing about all of these has been that I am still able to use the tracklogs I generated about 15 years ago. I keep multiple back up copies in case some computer drive fails and while the accuracy of some of the track logs aren't that good I can clean them up now with better software mapping products and make it work out.

    But the best GPS now is the Montana without a doubt. The evolution of GPS has really improved to the point of track logs without dropouts and maps that are easy to load onto the unit. I was even able to generate a map from a PDF file this week. A first for me for sure. That is a really good thing. Custom maps for a GPS.

    Steve
  • babj615 41 Points
    Funny thing is, I was also an early Oregon 400t adopter. Never had a single problem with that unit either.


    Sounds like he didn't even keep it long enough to try any firmware updates. Seems like Garmin released some good ones for the Oregon.
    Firmware updates were not going to fix improperly installed motherboards. Even Garmin admitted that and replaced my 400t with a new one right off the shelf, also with an improperly mounted motherboard. With my units, the slightest grip, like to ensure you were not going to drop it off a bridge while crossing it, or jumping across a creek, would cause the unit to crash/shut down.

    I adopted way to early ;-)
  • babj615 41 Points
    What I'm seeing on the Montana reminds me of the early days with the Oregon. Garmin kept adding new functions, which is something I had never seen on any of their other products. OTOH, some people might argue that they released it before the software was finished. :wink:
    I love new functions!

    Especially when they work ;-)
  • sviking 141 Points
    Firmware updates were not going to fix improperly installed motherboards. Even Garmin admitted that and replaced my 400t with a new one right off the shelf, also with an improperly mounted motherboard. With my units, the slightest grip, like to ensure you were not going to drop it off a bridge while crossing it, or jumping across a creek, would cause the unit to crash/shut down.

    I adopted way to early ;-)
    Yeah, hardware issues are another thing completely. Did every one of the units you received as a return do the same thing with shutting down if you squeezed the case? Hmmm...maybe I should go "squeeze check" my Montana. :lol:

    Hey, thanks again for the help on main menu icons. I keep forgetting about that darned wiki. :roll:
  • marvin02 31 Points
    Navigon 2100 Max

    a TomTom that I can't remember the model number of (given to a family member)

    Garmin 3790 LMT (which has worked great for me in the two weeks I have had it)

    I also have a GPS unit that plugs into the USB port of my laptop that came with a 2008? version of Microsoft Streets and Trips.
  • jdgwinnell 91 Points
    I have far too many, but my 'main' unit for everyday use is still the fabulous 3790, even more loved now it can import routes AND follow them to the end... with post-purchase lifetime EU maps;
    Montana 650 for its screen size, really useful when using BirdsEye photos and maps, and fabulous, versatile and evolving firmware;
    Oregon 550t, not used so much now but retained because it's paired with a CN DVD map of the Middle East and Northern Africa (a mistake - it's SOOO slow to calculate routes from that map, but unlike a nuvi its battery life is long enough to be used on a day's worth of taxi rides)
    nuvi 2450LM - for trips across the water, and getting a local unit is the only [legitimate] way to get lifetime maps with Junction View;
    nuvi 710 because it takes full-sized SD cards and is paired with my Southern Africa routable topo map from GarMap SA;
    nuvi 760 because it was the last text-to-speech model (until the Montana, I think) that imported the entire route from MapSource, i.e. including the possibly thousands of intermediate points the program calculates, and followed it slavishly;
    GPSMap 60 CSx because it was the best handheld available at the time and is paired with a lot of expensive French topo maps;
    etrex Venture Cx for use just to record tracks in situations where something small and inconspicuous (dull grey colour) is needed, or when I wouldn't mind it being stolen;

    and my latest acquisition is the localised Indian model of the nuvi 40LM for when I'm working there, which comes with lifetime maps of India and Malaysia/Singapore. Launched at the end of May and only available within India. Does text-to-speech with a charming Indian accent...

    In honourable retirement are the GPS12, StreetPilot 2720 and 2820.
  • alanb 533 Points
    I have 3 ... 755T & 855 nuvi's and Oregon 550T and all of them are used regularly. This doesn't count the DeLorme LT-20 and LT-40 I still have but no longer use (they require a laptop with software, so are not dedicated).

    I have considered getting a 3790 or 3490/3590 to replace the 855. I also wish I had held out for a Montana when I got the Oregon ... maybe someday.
  • wbport 92 Points
    I started with a nuvi 260w but gave it to another family member a few years ago when I got a 255w. I've kept the maps updated and don't plan on being in the market for something newer for a while, especially if GPS is built into my next cellphone.
  • sviking 141 Points
    I have considered getting a 3790 or 3490/3590 to replace the 855. I also wish I had held out for a Montana when I got the Oregon ... maybe someday.
    Got my camelcamelcamel.com price alert set for a $275 (or less) Montana 600. It will get there...eventually... Same as how it alerted me to my $225 3790T when I wanted that one at $500+ when they were released. Took just over a year. :wink:
  • jd_1138 0 Points
    I bought a refurb'd Garmin C330 StreetPilot in 2007 for a job I had that required me to go to about 5 different addresses everyday. I had gotten tired of printing out a bunch of MapQuest/Google Map pages everyday at home before leaving for work. I fell in love with the ease of GPS, and a few months later I upgraded to a Nuvi 200.

    Then my employer bought us all Tomtom 130S's a year later for Christmas. Hardly any of the other employees had GPS's. At first I didn't like the Tomtom UI, but after learning it in and out, it's now my favorite UI and device. I used the Tomtom 130S for a couple of years before buying a Tomtom 140S. Then I gave the Tomtom 130 and the Garmin StreetPilot away to family members who needed them.

    I used the Tomtom 140S as my primary and the Garmin Nuvi as a backup for a couple of years. Until the 140S got stolen, and then I got a Tomtom Ease and it too was stolen. So then I had to buy ANOTHER Tomtom Ease which is what I am using now. I've also owned Magellans which are alright but I just prefer Tomtoms. My employer issued all of us Navigons a couple of years ago. I accepted one just to try it, but it was horrible, so I turned it back into HR.
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