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Smart Phones with a True GPS Reciever

coronan 0 Points
edited November -1 in Smartphone Navigation
It can be hard to differentiate what phone navigate based on cell towers and which have a true GPSR chip.

Anyone have a list of phones with GPSR chips?

Or recommended phone with great gps in rural areas? Offline?

Thanks!!!

Comments

  • Tim 1456 Points
    It isn't clear to me what you are trying to accomplish, so I'll answer the question base best I can based on what you have said.

    Virtually every phone on the market today which advertises it has a GPS or navigation capabilities has a "true" GPS chip in it. However so as not to totally kill the battery life of the phone they use low power chips, and those chips will also use available information from towers to get your location faster than a stand-alone chip. Sine those chips are lower powered they don't often perform as well as a dedicated GPS device (without phone) in areas outside of cell coverage.

    I can't think of any phones which use a dedicated GPS chip (that would totally kill battery life anyway) that isn't also designed to be low powered and augment its capabilities based on cellular data. Doesn't mean they don't exist, but I can't think of any.
  • You answered the right question. Sorry i was not specific enough.

    I find your answer strange.
    1. My garmin map60csx runs for nearly 20 hours on only 2 aa batteries.
    2. GPSR is a global positioning satellite RECIEVER. A receiving chip measures the time lapse from an atomic clock on the satellite to come up with a position. Its just a calculator doing trig. I don't see what is so high power about that.

    When the phone can not make contact with cell towers it boost its signal strength to establish service thus killing my battery.

    So, What I hear you saying is no cell phone has navigation service out side of cell range???

    What are they putting in the tablets that dont have cell modems????
  • First the two AA batteries in your map60 might offer more available power than your smartphone does. The latest iPhone (5S) has only a 1570 mAh battery compared to common AA rechargables with 2000mAh ratings or better.

    That relatively small 1600mAh battery is expected to do a lot more in your smartphone than is expected of your Garmin. You've got two power-hungry processors, one for baseband and one for apps, wi-fi and bluetooth radios searching for connections, a high-resolution backlit display that requires more power to drive it, and a device that's constantly trading data with the network while waiting for notifications.

    Talk-time on that iPhone is less than 10 hours. Take that high-power gps chipset from your map60 and use it in an iPhone and how much use do you think you'll get from it? Even the low-power gps the iPhone has is a significant added drain on those finite battery resources. It's one of the three services (bluetooth and wifi are the others) that smartphone users typically disable when not needed to extend battery life.

    But with that said Tim is not saying "no cell phone has navigation service out side of cell range" as you're suggesting. Of course they do if it has a gps-capable chipset, and like Tim I can't think of a smartphone without one. It's not lasting you anywhere near 20 hours tho like your map60 and the heavier the tree cover the harder gps will have to work finding and sorting those weak satellite signals.
  • Tim 1456 Points
    So, What I hear you saying is no cell phone has navigation service out side of cell range???
    No. Gatorguy is right on; here are a couple of scenarios for you.

    You turn on your mobile phone in an area with cellular service. The low power GPS chip gets a hint from the cellphone towers as to where it is, effectively narrowing down the possibilities from "anywhere on earth" to within a few mile radius. With that huge hint the GPS chip doesn't need to search as hard to figure out where you are. Now you drive out of cell coverage. No huge worry as the GPS will have been keeping up with your location and it will use that to figure keep up.

    Second scenario... You turn on your mobile phone outside of an area with cellular service and to add problems your phone is hundreds of miles away from where it last had a GPS fix. In this scenario, without a hint from the cell towers and having tried to figure out where you were from the last known position the GPS chipset is on its own to figure out where you are. With a weaker receiver capability than a dedicated GPS chip it will take a very long time to figure out where you are from this "cold" start. And if you have an obstructed space view it is possible you could fully deplete a battery before it finds you.
  • Thanks for being patient with me.

    I keep my gps off most of the time, until I need it.

    My current phone (Samsung sch-i510) will loose my location frequently when traveling out of cell service regardless of cached maps, Even if I have started from a known location.

    Last night, As a test, I put my phone in airplane mode, then turned on Gps and wifi. It took my phone about 20 minutes to find my location.

    How do I improve this on my next phone???
  • Tim 1456 Points
    I'm not sure there is a ton you can do. That is simply the nature of phones with GPS these days. Until battery technology improves I don't think most manufacturers will put in more powerful GPS chips due to the trade-off for battery life.
  • Tim 1456 Points
    It would certainly help with GPS reception-- at the expense of battery life and size/convenience.
  • My application is 4x4 trails with out a tablet. or Really remote back roads.
    I tablet with gps is I my near future, but I would have to plan to have it with me.

    Nevada has millions of miles of dirt roads. I frequent remote head waters to go rafting.

    Any recommended Bluetooth GPS receivers that can pair with a phone???
    And one that wont break the bank?

    I noticed that most are intended to pair with a laptop which may not offer software / drivers to pair with a phone.
  • Boyd 1737 Points
    I did this review of the Garmin GLO recently. I didn't use it with a phone but others do. If you go to the product page at GPSCity there's a FAQ that discusses use on various phones and tablets.

    I paid $90 for the GLO, not sure what amount would "break your bank". ;)

    http://gpstracklog.com/2013/04/garmin-glo-review.html

    Also see further discussion here: http://forums.gpsreview.net/discussion/27533/x/p1/
  • Great write up on the GLO!!!

    I found these to articles interesting.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GLONASS#Receivers

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Smartphones_using_GLONASS_Navigation

    Are the phones listed of higher accuracy than others?
  • Using "gps status & tool box".
    In this app im looking forward to "Background Behavior to keep GPS on while screen is off."

    Also running "Fasterfix"
    Got my ping time down to 1 min while inside a cement building.


    This thread was helpful:
    http://www.droidforums.net/forum/droid-3-tech-support/179250-fix-gps-problems-solutions.html
  • More supplementary info from another forum:

    I thought the GPS and radios were alright but had heard too many people talk bad about them. Once I spent a little time with the Razr Maxx and the Rezound I got a little pissed at Samsung. My Rezound picks up over 20 satelites and locks to at least 10 within a few seconds and that's sitting on my couch at home. The Razr is a couple of seconds slower. My GNex might see 8 satelites and struggle to lock onto 4 in a minute or so and it's not that much faster outdoors.

    from:
    http://www.chargeforums.com/forum/droid-charge-general-discussions/7726-what-will-your-next-device-6.html

    CAN ANYONE EXPLAIN THIS?
  • Could be the efficiency of the antenna design/placement in specific handsets. There's a lot of science involved in it.
    http://www.antenna-theory.com/design/gps.php

    Could also be attributed to software, the specific chipset used or some combination of all three.
  • I am using HTC desire 600 phone and after reading your thread just checked the GPRS chips of some phones like Nokia, Samsung, Karbonn etc. and found all GPRS chips are different from everyone.
  • LeftyT 0 Points
    It seems that all smartphone chips are front-end receivers relying on software, phone's cpu and celltower thereabouts. That's fine fer city-folk. Us explorers and back-country folk will have to wait for iRedneck featuring sony's CXD5601GG chip, which would be far less power consumption "offline". Meanwhile, there's plenty of pricey GNSS receivers all the way down to >1m accuracy. It's doubtful that ANY built-in chip will ever approach cm accuracy, because it's all about the antenna at that point.
    Did you find anything better, nevada- coronan?
  • I use an old Galaxy S5 that has no cell phone service on it - on airplane mode -and I get accuracy down to less than 3 meter on the reg.

    Taking if offshore to see how good/far it works. I figure 100 miles out if it fixes better than a sextant shot it's worthwhile.
    LeftyT said:

    It seems that all smartphone chips are front-end receivers relying on software, phone's cpu and celltower thereabouts. That's fine fer city-folk. Us explorers and back-country folk will have to wait for iRedneck featuring sony's CXD5601GG chip, which would be far less power consumption "offline". Meanwhile, there's plenty of pricey GNSS receivers all the way down to >1m accuracy. It's doubtful that ANY built-in chip will ever approach cm accuracy, because it's all about the antenna at that point.
    Did you find anything better, nevada- coronan?

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