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Is EcoRoute HD a security risk?

I thought that this claim from @Pete57 deserved a thread of its own….

http://forums.gpsreview.net/discussion/comment/195792#Comment_195792
I have learned that Ecoroute HD provides an unsecure wireless access to the car OBD2 connection which in turn can be used to clone a car key from outside and thus the bad guys can steal my car easily without breaking and entering. Therefore I would not dare use Ecoroute HD anyway even if it worked properly. I would need a guarantee from Garmin that the wireless connection to OBD2 is secure with strong encryption and authentication. There is no password setting for the connection so I have to assume it is not secure enough. And BMW should give a guarantee that OBD2 does not provide key cloning information in recent models.
Here's one article I found in a quick search: http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2012/09/18/bmw-stolen-hacking-kit/

Comments

  • SergZak 340 Points
    Thank goodness I have an old (1994 Mustang GT) car which is incapable of such wireless shenanigans.

    Very interesting read nonetheless.
  • Boyd 2002 Points
    edited June 2014
    I have often wondered how secure the new keyless entry systems are. I always assumed that the transmission from the wireless remote to the car was encrypted, but this makes me wonder how good that encryption might be (if any). My 2009 VW had regular external key locks in addition to the wireless remote. My 2011 only has the remote. I later learned that there is a hidden key slot that you have to pop a plastic cover off to reveal. The owners manual lists some caveats about using it, evidently the security system isn't disabled when entering this way (although it seems to work as expected for me).

  • SergZak 340 Points
    edited June 2014
    Thieves are a crafty bunch. I'll bet at the time that these wireless communications were being developed, encryption was likely not even given a second thought. Now that it's flaws have been exposed, the affected parties are scrambling for solutions.

    Hey, if BMW's (I'm just going by BMW's reputation and price) wireless transmissions are not secure/encrypted, I don't see why other "lower-end" manufacturers would be either.
  • Boyd 2002 Points
    http://www.today.com/news/police-admit-theyre-stumped-mystery-car-thefts-6C10169993
    A Long Beach, Calif., surveillance video shows a thief approaching a locked SUV in a driveway. Police say he's carrying a small device in the palm of his hand. You can barely see it, but he aims it at the car and pops the locks electronically. He's in, with access to everything. No commotion at all.

    Then his accomplice shows up and hits another car, using that same handheld device.

    Long Beach Deputy Police Chief David Hendricks is mystified. "This is bad in the sense we're stumped," he told us. "We are stumped and we don't know what this technology is."

    He said it's almost like the thieves are cloning your car remote, which is virtually impossible to do. Here's why: On most cars, when you hit the unlock button, it sends a code to the car. That code is encrypted and constantly changing — and should be hackproof.
  • willyboy 68 Points
    With all this technology to supposedly makes our lives simpler, it doesn't come without risks.
    Being an old timer I personally like things simpler. We are getting far too dependent on gadgets that make tasks easier to do, but do so at a price when thieves are one step ahead of us.

    I'm amused at all options in our homes. A toilet that flushes using a sensor, a sink providing water at the touch of the hand. Now unless you have a generator in case of a power failure,
    you're literaly SOL if you need to relieve yourself. And all those apps to turn devices on and off within your home from remote locations. The thieves will soon (if not already) be unlocking your front door and walking in.
  • SergZak 340 Points
    edited June 2014
    Good post, willyboy. Personally, I've never, ever found it to be a nuisance to unlock/open my car door or start my car by using the key. Same goes for unlocking the house door. And as far as possibly locking my keys in the car or losing them somewhere, I have a spare hidden on the vehicle...same for the house key. I really doubt that a thief would think of searching my car to find out if there's a hidden key there.
  • Boyd 2002 Points
    Now unless you have a generator in case of a power failure,
    you're literaly SOL if you need to relieve yourself.
    You must be a city boy. :) If you live in the country and depend on well water, then you will have the same problem during a power outage. I've had a generator since about 1990, primarily for this (the woodstove provides all the heat I need and I have plenty of candles).
  • willyboy 68 Points
    Now unless you have a generator in case of a power failure,
    you're literaly SOL if you need to relieve yourself.


    You must be a city boy. :) If you live in the country and depend on well water, then you will have the same problem during a power outage. I've had a generator since about 1990, primarily for this (the woodstove provides all the heat I need and I have plenty of candles).
    No I'm not a "city boy", I live in the suburbs which do provide city water. In 40 years living here I was never out of water, but was without electric at times. I do have a generator when power failures do occur but only use for bare essentials and have no concerns if I can use the toilet since it's manual as is my sinks and showers.

    Having to throw out spoiled food on several occasions due to power failures, I invested in a generator.
  • SergZak 340 Points
    edited June 2014
    I'll bet Boyd has plenty of trees (and likely a shovel as well) on his property in case of water failure... :)
  • Boyd 2002 Points
    Yes Sergey, that is another advantage to living back in the woods. 😊 I also have a stream running through my property.
  • willyboy 68 Points
    Yes Sergey, that is another advantage to living back in the woods. 😊 I also have a stream running through my property.
    Appears you are self sufficient, water from the well and in case of emergency water from the stream to boil. Maybe fish in the stream for dinner. And light, albeit candle power.
    Lasty, the woods is your outhouse in emergencies. What more can a man ask for.
  • Boyd 2002 Points
    Yeah, I love it. But until I retired, the 110 mile commute to Philadelphia was brutal. :)
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