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Garmin introduces two Android based devices

These are specifically designed for trucks/fleets, but the price is similar to the nuvi and the ability to customize them with third party apps and peripherals looks very interesting.

image

https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/on-the-road/fleet/garmin-fleet-660/prod168406.html
https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/on-the-road/fleet/garmin-fleet-670/prod168656.html

Additional Specs

Tri-axis accelerometer: yes
Connectivity support: Wi-Fi®, Wi-Fi Direct, Miracast, USB (micro), Bluetooth® 2.1+EDR
NFC for driver/vehicle identification and data synchronization: yes
microSD™ card slot: yes
GPS sensitivity: strong, even in-cab through high sensitivity GPS
Plug and play: yes with unique magnetic powered mount
Audio/video: yes, cab quality (with file playback from microSD card and built-in storage space up to 1080P30 (support for mp3, wmv, wma); hands-free driver operation with automatic speech recognition/Bluetooth support)


http://garmin.blogs.com/pr/2014/08/garmin-introduces-its-first-android-based-fleet-navigators.htm

Garmin International Inc., a unit of Garmin Ltd. (NASDAQ: GRMN), the global leader in satellite navigation, today announced the fleetTM 660 and 670, two new fleet navigators that combine the simplicity of Garmin navigation with the unique customization options of Android. With the fleet 660 for local fleets and the fleet 670 for commercial truck fleets, service providers can introduce customized applications and value-added services that meet the unique requirements of their customers. The new devices also connect to and control a wide range of external devices over Wi-Fi®, Bluetooth®, or serial cable. “The fleet 660 and 670 are our first fleet products that combine trusted Garmin navigation and hardware with the flexibility of Android,” said Chad Sallman, Senior Business Development Manager for Commercial Solutions at Garmin. “These new devices remove many of the hurdles fleet service providers face today, making it easier than ever to develop customized solutions for both medium and large, enterprise class customers.“ The ubiquity of the Android platform makes fleet service providers less dependent on third-party technology companies when developing customized fleet solutions. Providers can easily integrate existing applications from their partners for signature captures, work orders, or inspection reports, for example. The easy-to-use interface is fully customizable and applications and widgets can be added onto the device home screen. The fleet 660 and 670 hardware is optimized for in-cab use with a dust-proof design, high-sensitivity GPS, extra loud speaker, and a sunlight readable, 6-inch capacitive touch screen that makes it easy to see driving-related information at a glance. A powered magnetic mount allows for a quick and easy removal between vehicles. Through Bluetooth and WIFI the devices wirelessly connect to a black box data transponder or other sensors and peripherals, such as a wireless printer or card reader. The fleet 660 and 670 include the latest navigation technology from Garmin, such as Garmin Real Directions™, voice activated navigation, Active Lane Guidance with voice prompts as well as free lifetime traffic1 and maps2. Both devices also feature an integrated gyroscope to record and analyze driving behavior and support Near Field Communication (NFC) for driver and vehicle identification and data synchronization. The fleet 660 is designed for local-service fleets while the fleet 670 is ideal for commercial long-haul trucking fleets with its trucking-specific functions, such as route calculation based on truck attributes, trucking points of interest, Hours of Service (HOS) logging, and International Fuel Tax Agreement Documentation (IFTA). The fleet 660 has suggested retail price of $399.99 and the fleet 670 has a suggested retail price of $449.99. Both devices are expected to become available in the fourth quarter of 2014.

Comments

  • t923347 532 Points
    Interesting alternative but I wonder if these devices will come with pre-installed maps. At present the webpages for both models show no maps included "in the box" or under the Maps tab.
  • Boyd 2002 Points
    edited August 2014
    That must just be a mistake (as we frequently see in the specs for new products. If no map is included, then what do you suppose the lifetime map updates are for? ;)
    ___________________________________

    Free Lifetime Map Updates
    Roads change. Businesses open and close. fleet 660 enables you to keep your device up-to-date with the latest maps¹ that Garmin has to offer, with no fees.
  • werewolf 112 Points
    edited August 2014
    "Free Lifetime Map Updates
    Roads change. Businesses open and close. fleet 660 enables you to keep your device up-to-date with the latest maps¹ that Garmin has to offer, with no fees."


    THEY ARE LYING.

    And their Garmin Monterra boondoggle was also Android.
  • Boyd 2002 Points
    edited August 2014
    Yeah, I can just imagine the secret meeting of the sneaky marketing deparment at Evil Garmin… "Let's include free updates for the non-existant map, then soak them an extra $100 for City Navigator!" >:)

    I am staying away from the Monterra, it sounds like a mess, but that is a very different beast - a rugged outdoor machine with special screen and new apps. This is just another Android tablet, and they have experience with these (have been marketing a version of the Nuvi 3590 that runs Android in Asia for a couple years). The Android StreetPilot app (not available in the US or EU) is basically a Nuvi, along with its newer cousin the Android ViaGo app. Going back to around 2007, the Nuvi 8xx and 5000 were also Linux based devices.

    Also consider that the Fleet 660 lists for $400 while the Monterra is about twice that much. They are marketing them for fleet management, and not the general public like the Nuvi anyway. But I will be very interested to learn more about this unit and how much customization it allows. :)
  • alanb 557 Points
    I wonder if there are some Android automotive models in the works. Garmin has not had any model announcements in the nuvi line for a long time now, and there have been no 2014 models in the Advanced and Prestige series
  • Boyd 2002 Points
    edited August 2014
    I was also wondering if they will go to Android on the Nuvi line. But seems like they are happy with their own proprietary operating system for mainstream devices. It has to be a lot more work providing support when users can install their own apps. But maybe they would have an advanced Android model, like the one they offer in Asia?

    What I would really like to see is an advanced off-road type model. Could just be one of these fleet models running the Garmin Outdoor app they already have on the Monterra. :)

    BTW, interesting that they chose a 6" screen for these fleet models when the Dezl 760 has a 7" screen.
  • werewolf 112 Points
    edited August 2014
    Boyd said:

    Yeah, I can just imagine the secret meeting of the sneaky marketing deparment at Evil Garmin… "Let's include free updates for the non-existant map, then soak them an extra $100 for City Navigator!" >:)


    No, let's call something "lifetime" and then mess around with the fine print...

    The Garmin sheister lawyers have retroactively added at least one clause to that fine print disclaimer of theirs:

    "A product will be deemed to be out of service and its useful life to be ended if no updates have been downloaded for such product for a period of 24 months or more. "

    http://www.garmin.com/en-US/legal/lmdisclaimer

    How convenient for them. They just don't offer any more updates for their older devices, like my six year old 276C, so - voila! - "lifetime" is over!.



  • Tim 1484 Points
    werewolf said:

    like my six year old 276C

    More like the 10 year old 276c, back when the lifetime product didn't even exist for another several years.
    http://www8.garmin.com/pressroom/marine/021204b.html
  • werewolf 112 Points
    edited August 2014
    Tim said:

    werewolf said:

    like my six year old 276C

    More like the 10 year old 276c, back when the lifetime product didn't even exist for another several years.
    http://www8.garmin.com/pressroom/marine/021204b.html
    When I go to MyGarmin.com it tells me the exact date that I received my current 276C from Garmin, Sep 2, 2008. That's less than six years ago. I did have a 276C before that, but it broke, and I sent it back to Garmin and they sold me another refurbished unit. I didn't buy the "lifetime" map updates at that time. I bought it later. On MyGarmin it lists the NuMaps "Lifetime" N.A. maps I've downloaded. The earliest one shown is the 2011.20, so that was probably the first one I downloaded. It even has the date of the download, Aug 17, 2010. So then Garmin's "lifetime" map downloads turned out to be four years.

  • t923347 532 Points
    edited August 2014
    Man, we get it! You think you've been given the shaft by Garmin, even though you've had the opportunity to install 16 map updates since your first one in Aug/10. Even if you paid $150.00 for the lifetime update subscription that's still less than $10 an update which is one heck of a lot less than you would have paid buying one update at a time. Could we please just move on. :(
  • Tim 1484 Points
    My point is simply that your 276c might only be six years old, but that model itself started hitting stores in April of 2004. The Garmin Lifetime map product was announced at CES in January of 2009 and available shortly after. (I was there.)
  • werewolf 112 Points
    edited August 2014
    Tim said:

    My point is simply that your 276c might only be six years old, but that model itself started hitting stores in April of 2004. The Garmin Lifetime map product was announced at CES in January of 2009 and available shortly after. (I was there.)

    Actually I got one of the very first 276's to hit the market. I had to return that one right away because the early ones had a problem with the jack breaking off when you removed the cord. The one I returned in '08, the buttons became balky and then broke altogether. I really would have kept my black and white 176 going but I dropped it and the screen became a bit tarnished. In one way it was better than the 276, much better visibility in daylight without needing to turn on the backlight. It's still working, last time I checked anyway. I like to keep things going.

    How do you mean you were there? Do you, or did you, work for Garmin?
  • Boyd 2002 Points
    edited August 2014
    I think Tim means that "he was there" at CES, the Consumer Electronics Show.

    As t923347 said, "Could we please just move on"? Complaints about lifetime maps for your six year old / ten year old GPS have nothing to do with the topic of this thread.
  • Tim 1484 Points
    No, I was (sort of still am though rarely now) an independent tech reporter covering GPS, written a few articles on consumer GPS for a few national magazines, etc. I've never worked for any GPS company.
  • Boyd 2002 Points
    The 2797 will have virtually nothing in common with the 276. Please start a new thread if you want to discuss this. I don't like deleting posts, but you have taken this thread WAY off topic.
  • Tim 1484 Points
    No need to delete, I've split the thread to here: Road and Offroad Replacement for 276c.
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