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Garmin Agrees to buy DeLorme

Now here is some interesting news from Garmin, they are purchasing DeLorme! DeLorme is vey well known for their state Gazetteer (paper) maps, as well as their cartography and GIS software. They also have a good business in the two way satellite messenger (GPS) product category. A traditional handheld GPS line also exists, but has been a stale product category of late.
Garmin will retain most of the associates of DeLorme and will continue operations at its existing location in Yarmouth, Maine following the completion of the acquisition. The Yarmouth facility will operate primarily as a research and development facility and will continue to develop two-way satellite communication devices and technologies.
Press release

Comments

  • Boyd 1980 Points
    Wow, that's amazing. Wonder what that will mean for Delorme's PC software business? Their Street Atlas software is one of the few remaining choices for the die-hard laptop navigation crowd. ;)
  • t923347 426 Points
    edited February 2016
    Maybe they could have a shot at the Street Atlas user interface which IMO has always been a bit of a disaster, especially compared to the now dead Microsoft Streets & Trips. :)
  • Tim 1479 Points
    Not to mention Mac and/or web app developers.
  • Boyd 1980 Points
    t923347 said:

    Maybe they could have a shot at the Street Atlas user interface which IMO has always been a bit of a disaster

    Yeah, it looks like antique software, pretty much on par with Garmin nRoute, which was discontinued many years ago. Hard to imagine Garmin devoting any resources to something as outdated as Street Atlas, when they discontinued MobilePC long ago and it was a much more modern program.
  • alanb 539 Points
    edited February 2016
    I am not surprised to hear that DeLorme is being sold. I wondered how much longer they could keep going. I am surprised that it is Garmin. I wonder what Garmin thinks they get out of this purchase?

    Edit: found the answer on another site
    Garmin indicated that it is particularly interested in getting inReach, DeLorme’s handheld satellite communications device, which was launched in 2011. The device allows users to send and receive text messages and issue an SOS in locations where cell service isn’t available. The product is popular with sailors and hikers.

    A company official said last year that inReach accounts for about half of the company’s $20 million in annual revenue.
    http://m.nasdaq.com/article/garmin-to-buy-delorme---quick-facts-20160211-00355
  • Boyd 1980 Points
    No need to search the web for that. Just read the news release in Tim's link. The satellite communications devices were the only thing that was mentioned. ;)
  • Tim 1479 Points
    DeLorme as a whole is a much different company than most people, especially GPS people like ourselves, might believe. Their roots are in cartography, paper maps, atlases, and commercial GIS software. GPS has been a recent side business which took off for them and became a big portion of their business.

    People from New England know them for their Gazetteer line of state map books which are second to none for outdoor enthusiasts. Most people from New England who know of DeLorme might not even know that they make GPS devices. It seems like nearly everyone in Maine (or at least every vehicle) has a copy of their blue Gazetteer.

    For Garmin, the two way messenger that DeLorme has (along with the associated patents) is the big offering they want. Garmin hasn't been able to break into this market as much as they hoped and acquiring DeLorme is an easy ticket in.

    DeLorme's footing in the commercial GIS space shouldn't be ignored, either and is perhaps another interest of Garmin. Their Xmap software is often used for commercial GPS mapping, especially outside of urban areas. I know our nearby search and rescue teams use it, the state government uses it, and it is also used by pipeline contractors, wind farm site work, etc.

    To me, what Garmin gets out of this is clear... two way satellite messaging capabilities in consumer GPS, as well as some commercial GIS technologies. Note they also get an additional basemap dataset, one particularly suited to outdoor enthusiasts.

    DeLorme gets a solid financial footing.
  • Tim 1479 Points
    “There are a lot of assets [DeLorme has] that we’re interested in, and that includes the atlases and gazetteers.”
    -- Ted Gartner, Garmin spokesman
  • gatorguy 325 Points
    edited February 2016
    Tim, while you may have seen this coming it certainly surprises me. But acquiring inReach does give them even more credibility in nav solutions, probably paying dividends beyond just the Delorme assets. Curious how much Garmin paid for them.
  • gatorguy 325 Points
    The Portland Press Herald has a really good article up about Delorme and it's products, what they mean to Maine, and the future outlook for the company with Garmin as the new owner.
    http://www.pressherald.com/2016/02/11/yarmouth-based-mapmaker-delorme-sold-to-garmin/
  • Tim 1479 Points
    Oh, I didn't see it coming-- but it certainly makes sense for both parties.
  • Boyd said:

    Wow, that's amazing. Wonder what that will mean for Delorme's PC software business? Their Street Atlas software is one of the few remaining choices for the die-hard laptop navigation crowd. ;)

    Probably means we will have to try and make RouteBuddy work. Oh well who wants to know where they are going when traveling the back roads like we do. More challenge to find your way through small town USA with a big paper map on the steering wheel. Nothing like going back in time. Next week we'll replace the RV with a covered wagon and mules.

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