This site uses cookies to offer you a better browsing experience. Find out more about how to manage cookies, or dismiss this message and continue to use cookies.

Oregon 600

I am asking for feedback regarding this device. It looks good to me - on paper - and without needing to rob a bank for it.
How have owners found it?
Reviews on Amazon are quite mixed - perhaps because of software issues that have been resolved?

I'm wanting to finally "go touchscreen" - and leave my trusty eTrex 20.

Comments

  • sussamb 813 Points
    Well it will depend on your use but I have the Etrex 20 and a Montana .... Prefer my Etrex to my 'touchscreen' Montana :)
  • Ramaprem 112 Points
    Care to tell me why?

    Mostly, I will be using it to navigate in unfamiliar cities - with OSMaps installed.
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    Have you considered a smartphone with apps as an alternative? The Oruxmaps Android app is my favorite, and it's free. On iOS, I use Galileo which is also free, but you will probably want the "pro features" which cost $9 IIRC.

    I have a Montana 600 and GPSMap6ocsx, previously had an Oregon 400t and eTrex Legend C. The Oregon 600 looks like a nice device (on paper for me as well), so if I was determined to buy another Garmin handheld, it would be high on my list. But I prefer the largest possible screen, and think I would find the Oregon too small after getting used to the Montana. But the Montana looks really small to me now, after getting used to the 5.5" iPhone 6s Plus. :))
  • Ramaprem 112 Points
    Yes - I have.
    It's a battle I'm having these days. With myself.

    I don't have a new-enough phone to use it as you suggest, so I would have to buy one. And I'm not really a phone user. If I were to get a phone for my uses, I would also like the 6s Plus! Expensive for what I want - to say the least.
    And the battery life of the phone can't compare with that of the Garmin for my use.
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    What kind of price are you seeing for the Oregon? I'd be surprised if it's much cheaper than trading in your old phone for a new iPhone. Certainly depends on your use patterns, but I can get around 5 hours on battery with my phone and the screen on full brightness. If that isn't enough, you can double it with a battery case and they have gotten pretty inexpensive (you would want a rugged case anyway).

    I don't think of large screen device like the 6s Plus as a "phone" really, it's a small tablet computer with a laptop-class CPU and very fast SSD. The phone function is really more like an "app", I am not a "phone person" either, I spend very little time talking.

    All comes down to personal preference, but Garmin's hardware is looking about 5 years behind current smartphone technology, you are locked into their proprietary map format (far from state of the art) and you pay a premium price for all this.

    The good part is that Garmin handhelds are more like appliances than computers, they are rugged, reliable and have transreflective screens that are good at conserving battery.
  • Ramaprem 112 Points
    I can buy a new 600 for €300.
    My present phone has practically no trade-in value: €17. (It's old.) The 6s Plus costs almost €1,000!!

    I understand all that you say: external battery pack if needed (I already own one); smartphone technology being more advanced than Garmin's; etc. The argument for a phone over another Garmin handheld is, actually, compelling.

    I have never had a phone plan. I only have a prepaid PAYG phone.
    The iPhone uses GPS and GLONASS. But the GPS function is "assisted GPS" (although it is not always shown/written "assisted" in the specs - it is). My research shows me that assisted GPS requires cellular data. If I don't have a cellular plan, I won't have cellular data. So I won't have the use of GPS.
    Can someone tell me if that is true?

    If true, does that also apply to GLONASS? Or does GPS in that use refer to only the GPS (the United States') system?
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    You are way off base in your assumptions. The iPhone has full onboard GLONASS GPS capability. The assisted part is just an extra feature (and one you won't get with a handheld). On the operating system level, the iPhone compares the quality of the GPS chip data with a position fix from both cell towers and known wifi hotspots, then it chooses whichever is better. You can also use an external bluetooth GPS - I use a Garmin GLO - and it will add this to the list of signals to compare.

    If you are in an urban "canyon", the assisted GPS feature will be helpful since there are lots of wifi hotspots and cell towers to use. So the phone will perform better than a dedicated GPS device. I just wrote about this yesterday here: http://forums.gpsreview.net/discussion/comment/203447/#Comment_203447

    So it will be a plus to be able to use wifi hotspots in addition to GPS signals, even without cell service.

    You are thinking of old technology in your assumptions. There was a time when "a-gps" meant that the phone had a cheap GPS chip or maybe none at all. That was some time ago, the high end modern smartphones have come a long way since then. :)
  • Ramaprem 112 Points
    "...the high end modern smartphones have come a long way since then."
    Obviously, father than I have.

    "So it will be a plus to be able to use wifi hotspots in addition to GPS signals, even without cell service."
    Got it.

    Where's my piggy bank?
  • sussamb 813 Points
    Ramaprem said:

    Care to tell me why?

    Mostly, I will be using it to navigate in unfamiliar cities - with OSMaps installed.

    In that case my usage is very different to yours so ignore my comment :)

  • alanb 539 Points
    My only comment is that if you are using it to explore cities, I think you will be happier with Garmin City Navigator maps than you will with OSM on any dedicated Garmin PND.
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    I only use the Galileo app with the maps that I make myself, but it directly supports OSM: https://galileo-app.com

    Of course, on the iPhone you can also have City Navigator with the StreetPilot onboard app, as I have been writing about in the thread linked to above. It is not cheap however.
  • Ramaprem 112 Points
    @alanb
    Okay. The only handheld that I've ever had is the eTrex20, and the OSMs have been doing what I needed. I find that OSMs are remarkably detailed - including tiny foot paths, for example.
    I guess that you are suggesting that - if I go for the Oregon 600 - I'll be a happier camper with the CN maps.
    But now I'm leaning towards getting a phone - with its vastly superior, and touch, screen.

    @Boyd
    If I go the phone route, I'll probably use HERE or MAPS.ME or...
    I like what I see at MAPS.ME. Does anyone else use them? I think that one gets OSMs to use with the app.

    @sussamb
    If you wish to take the time, I'l like to hear what your usage is - and therefore why your choice. I'm trying to understand the situation as a whole.

    Thanks to all.
  • sussamb 813 Points
    I use my devices for hiking and SAR work. For SAR work I use my Montana as the larger screen gives me a better perspective, but when hiking prefer my Etrex as it fits better into my hand and I find the buttons easier to use when on the move, compared to the touchscreen of the Montana. Also battery life in the Etrex is better than the Montana.
  • Ramaprem 112 Points
    I also like the fit and feel of the eTrex in my hand. I find it more comfortable than a thin phone!
  • truckinguy 115 Points
    sussamb said:

    I use my devices for hiking and SAR work. For SAR work I use my Montana as the larger screen gives me a better perspective, but when hiking prefer my Etrex as it fits better into my hand and I find the buttons easier to use when on the move, compared to the touchscreen of the Montana. Also battery life in the Etrex is better than the Montana.

    Being an X Montana 600 and 610T user I love the Monterra now.. have you tried it? I was put out at first over the reviews about batttery life etc. But I find this unit so much better then the Montana now.. faster processor and just easier to use...screen is brighter too it seems to me. Something about it as I have handled it and used it for over a few weeks now is compelling not to go back to Montana.... I bought Apex Launcher and it does the Android nicely. I thought for sure I'd return it as I loved the Montana...

  • sussamb 813 Points
    Not tried the Monterra and can't see me bothering unless my other two break as they meet my needs ;)
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    The Oregon 600 is $400, the Monterra is $650. Just sayin'… ;)
  • truckinguy 115 Points
    My wife wants an Oregon...instead of using her phone after she's seen mine. .But I'm lucky I can afford the Monterra. But I did sell the 610T for $525 and a $600 for $400..so it's not like I put out the $700 ..
    I just did another hike up Mt. Cube.. NH today with the Monterra.. 5 miles 1500 ft gain...really excellent track...3 points every second..not jumps at all with the climbing up rock faces and ledges,tree cover,etc. .nice clear screen in the sun compared to the Montana...it seems..maybe it's the Android text...or whatever..Don't know why but it is... love the way it responds and ease of use. I'm totally surprised as so many trashed it for a while...probably when new... Got great battery life..just have to make sure the app's not needed are shut down. Google,etc.
    The camera isn't great with videos... I was panning the view on top very slowly and the play back on my PC wasn't great..my phone is better. But it's not bad. Pics aren't bad either. But I didn't buy it for the camera. Just for gps use in hiking and snowmaching..
Sign In or Register to comment.
↑ Top