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The legendary all-terrain navigation equipment is back: GPSMAP 276Cx

The legendary all-terrain navigation equipment is back: GPSMAP 276Cx




Developed from the versatile GPSMAP 276C offers the same high customizability
More sensors - GPS + GLONASS, altimeter and 3D compass
Big screen WVGA 5 "readable in sunlight
optional advanced navigation - nüvi mode, voice guidance text-to-speech, routes by winding roads, etc.
Full Bluetooth connection , ANT + and Wi-Fi - to keep in touch
recreational map preloaded Europe and 1 year subscription service Satellite images BirdsEye
More map options available - including BlueChart g2 and support for TOPO maps


https://www.garmin.com/en-US/blog/featured-2/announcement-gpsmap-276cx/
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Comments

  • werewolf 107 Points
    Another review:

    https://www.navigation-professionell.de/garmin-gpsmap-276cx-review-test/


    Amazon already has it listed but it is not yet for sale in the US.

    This could be what I was waiting for as I have been using the 276C for twelve years, and the 176 before that,,plust other Garmins going back to Model 2 (steam powered).

  • Boyd 1735 Points
    edited October 2016
    Gotta say, that looks very cool. Pretty much like what I've was hoping they would introduce several years ago - very similar to an updated version of my old StreetPilot 2620 that I loved 12 years ago. Would have been better with a 7" screen though. $800 pricetag and you need to buy the map separately… phew! ;)

    Thanks for posting.
  • Boyd 1735 Points
    edited October 2016
    Lookiing at those links, there are no screenshots of how one enters text or coordinates on this unit. Evidently it doesn't have a touchscreen… my 2620 had buttons and a touchscreen. That makes it pretty useless as a replacement for a Nuvi… do you really want to pick letters from a little grid to search for addresses, etc?

    And no screenshots of what it looks like with City Navigator. Does it have lane assist? Does it show the speed limit? I assume there would be no junction view, since that isn't available with separate purchases of City Navigator. And there would also be no lifetime map option, since they have discontinued the DVD of City Navigator. Doesn't look like there would be any way to get traffic data either.

    It would be a fun toy if I had a thousand bucks to spend on a lark, but it doesn't look like an "all in one" navigation solution to me.

    This is where I think Garmin is missing a big market segment. Why not offer this as an app for iOS and Android? I'm never gonna spend $800 on the hardware. but I might spend $150 on an app. And once people have bought the app, it would be easy to sell them maps… just click on a button for an impusle in-app purchase.
  • werewolf 107 Points
    Very good points, Boyd, and yes entering text or coordinates is a hassle on these models and I suppose this new one is the same.
  • werewolf 107 Points
    And yes it does look like maps are extra. I hope they also don't want to charge extra if you want to have sound, like they did with the 276! (did the 176 have any sound except beeps? I forgot.)
  • Boyd 1735 Points
    edited October 2016
    From the Globeriders' review in your link above:

    "the GPSMAP® 276Cx uses the same Garmin AMPS Rugged Mount - and, if you use a wired-headset, the 276Cx can be setup to pass Audio Out through the cable in the mount harness. "

    and

    "The GPSMAP® 276Cx uses Bluetooth to connect to your smartphone and your Bluetooth Headset as well as 276Cx to 276Cx data sharing. This device does not use the Garmin Smartphone Link App - it requires the Garmin Connect Mobile App"

    So it looks like there are two ways to get audio out. Doesn't say whether it supports voice prompts like the Montana/Monterra though. Too bad they didn't make it smartphone link compatible, that would have given you traffic data. :-S

    BTW, Dan Townsley's review is great. With Rich's departure from GPSTrackLog, I had almost forgotten what a thorough GPS review looked like.
  • AndreyT 104 Points
    edited October 2016
    Boyd said:

    BTW, Dan Townsley's review is great.

    ... and includes some not-so-subtle geopolitical trolling, I might add! :)

  • Boyd 1735 Points
    I must have missed that part...
  • werewolf 107 Points
    "So it looks like there are two ways to get audio out."


    Nor does it say anything about having built in speakers. Lots of unanswered questions. I'll wait for user reviews after it hits the market.

    More motorcyclist discussion:

    http://advrider.com/index.php?threads/garmin-announces-the-new-gpsmap-276cx.1178312/
  • Boyd 1735 Points
    Here's the product page: https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/prod539722.html

    I see that it can access 15,000 map segments. This is a big upgrade, other recent Garmin handhelds are limited to 4,000 segments although I think the new Oregon 700 also does 15,000. This is an important limit that most people fail to appreciate until it's too late. If you exceed the segment limit, some parts of your maps will stop working and the limit has nothing to do with the amount of storage space the maps use. In many cases, you could exceed the map segment limit with 4gb of maps.

    I get the impression that this device really isn't intended for regular street navigation. There is no indication of an automotive dashboard like the Montana offers (people have called this "Nuvi Mode", although that's not completely accurate). Anyway, it does give you a main screen like a Nuvi that shows speed limits and lane assist arrows at the upper left.

    Garmin has this City Navigator screenshot from the 276cx that doesn't show lane assist or speed limit.

    image

    The Montana also has an audio output jack and a mount that includes a speaker. These provide regular voice prompts when using City Navigator. Looking at the 276cx info again, I don't see any mention of this either.

    Interesting product, would love to play with it if somebody wants to send one to me. But $800? Are you serious? :O)
  • Boyd 1735 Points
    edited October 2016
    werewolf said:
    Finally had a look at that link. According to the author of the review, City Navigator speed limits can be displayed by choosing a field in the dashboard. But it does not speak street names, no lane assist, no junction view, no traffic.
  • Conceived by a Biker at Garmin and had to press them a while before being approved...nice... fits my Monterra mount's...I'll be getting one for my snowmachine... save my Monterra and Oregon 700 for hiking only..
  • Boyd 1735 Points
    The 276cx manual is now available: http://static.garmin.com/pumac/GPSMAP_276Cx_OM_EN.pdf
  • Red90 0 Points
    Boyd said:

    Here's the product page: https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/prod539722.html
    The Montana also has an audio output jack and a mount that includes a speaker. These provide regular voice prompts when using City Navigator. Looking at the 276cx info again, I don't see any mention of this either.

    It uses the exact same powered/speakered mount as the Montana.
  • Boyd 1735 Points
    Cool, then when Garmin decides to give me a 276cx I will already have a mount for it. But that's the only way I will ever have a chance to try one of these. ;)
  • truckinguy 108 Points
    edited October 2016
    Those motorcycle guys are loving this new one... real bright in sunlight... probably because of the no touch screen. They don't care about lane assist..I rarely use it myself ..I mean it hardly comes up while traveling..or typing in numbers,etc by touch screen.. the menu makes that simple..simple for searching poi nearby.. Glonass for perfect reception no matter were you are in this small world.... Most carry phones for any last needed needs while traveling..anyway.
    Lot of them are using Montana's and they are switching while I type as this one better... I'll be getting one for my snow machine... much better then the Monterra..or the Montana's I had.
    Again Garmin does a great job....it's going to be a great rugged well recieved unit for those needing this niche....this is not for those who want just to "play" with it... but serious navigators like bike travelers..Razor,Jeep,etc. for non serious Ford Focus users you have the phones and $100 Nuvi's..
  • Boyd 1735 Points
    Lane assist is the little arrows at the top left of the screen. These come up all over the place for me, everywhere. I consider it a must-have for street navigation. Maybe you're thinking of junction view?

    I'd hope a $800 GPS would be better than a $400 one….
  • truckinguy 108 Points
    edited November 2016
    Boyd said:

    Lane assist is the little arrows at the top left of the screen. These come up all over the place for me, everywhere. I consider it a must-have for street navigation. Maybe you're thinking of junction view?

    I'd hope a $800 GPS would be better than a $400 one….

    I put on 40k this year alone on my work truck....Dezl or 2597 on most of the time.. I'm not thinking junction view... Not that important ... and it may have the lanes arrows,etc on the top bar like mine does.. that's all one needs. Totally different beast between the 276CX and a Nuvi. Geared to a totally different market.
  • Re
    Boyd said:

    Lane assist is the little arrows at the top left of the screen. These come up all over the place for me, everywhere. I consider it a must-have for street navigation. Maybe you're thinking of junction view?

    I'd hope a $800 GPS would be better than a $400 one….

    I re read your post on the top left arrows... I was thinking lane assist is the right split screen with lanes showing magneta lines to be in. But we don't know what this can do or not. There is a Nuvi mode and lot's of settings to be dealt with.
  • Boyd 1735 Points
    I think you are talking about "Active Lane Guidance". I have a Dezl 760 and it has this feature.
  • How good are these compared with the Montana 650T please?

    Unfortunately someone helped themselves to my Montana in the airport security check on Monday.

    Use is on vintage/classic motorcycles with Joe Lucas 'Prince of Darkness' electrics on roads and green lanes (TalkyToaster maps) so long lasting battery (better with AA spares) needed. Custom maps and waterproof.

    Which one do I go for? top quality/functions more important than price.

    Might not have bought the Garmin Drivelux 50 LMT-D if this had happened six months earlier!
  • Boyd 1735 Points
    Here's a comparison to the Montana 680T (the replacement for the 650T)

    https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/catalog/product/compareResult.ep?compareProduct=523677&compareProduct=539722

    Have a look at the thread on the other site that has been mentioned here. Lots of discussion and comparisons to the Montana.

    http://advrider.com/index.php?threads/garmin-announces-the-new-gpsmap-276cx.1178312/

    I'm surprised by the battery specs that are shown on Garmin's site as compared to the Montana, and I wonder if they are correct. Posts in the advrider thread indicate that the GPSMap276cx does not have a transreflective screen. That means the backlight would have to be on full during bright conditions, whereas the Montana screen looks great in bright sun with no backlight (I have a Montana 600). Backlight use drains the battery faster, so it just seems a little hard to believe you could get 16 hours with it on all the time…
  • privet01 144 Points
    edited November 2016
    Boyd said:

    I'm surprised by the battery specs that are shown on Garmin's site as compared to the Montana, and I wonder if they are correct.

    It's been my experience with Garmin's cycling products, that they do correctly report the battery consumtion time. However it's with the caveat that use of all features not necessary for the intended basic function of the device are kept to a minimum.

    Backlighting is one of those features. Despite the fact that many of their cycling devices with color screens are difficult for most to read without backlighting. Especially if wearing polarized glasses.

  • Cheers, some interesting info!

    Assuming the Montana does not turn up on FleaBay I guess I'm in the market!
  • Boyd 1735 Points
    edited November 2016
    privet01 said:

    It's been my experience with Garmin's cycling products, that they do correctly report the battery consumtion time.

    That's fine, but I think all the other "cycling products" have transreflective screens. And then look at the Zumo 595 which the specs say *does* have a transreflective screen but only 4 hours battery life… https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/on-the-road/motorcycles/zumo-595lm/prod536397.html
  • privet01 144 Points
    Boyd said:

    And then look at the Zumo 595 which the specs say *does* have a transreflective screen but only 4 hours battery life… l

    I'm not sure what I'm supposed to be quibbling about. The Zumo is intended to be hooked up to the vehicle power for normal use and therefore just like nuvi's it has a smaller capacity battery or was designed with less costly parts that require more watts than the the typical devices intended for use with just battery power.
  • Boyd 1735 Points
    My only point is that the backlight must be on all the time if a screen is not transreflective. I'm just questioning whether any device can run for 16 hours like that. But I could very well be wrong, guess we will have to wait and see. :)
  • privet01 144 Points
    edited November 2016
    I think I and the Garmin people will disagree with you. The backlighting only needs to be on when you view the device. And if the ambient lighting intensity and angles are sufficient, you might not need it at all.

    None of my Garmin's do I view constantly. So those that work only on batery power have a timeout setting to turn off the backlighting within a few seconds of the last button push.
  • Battery life is certainly very important to me as the need to have the screen visible at all times. As a run leader for a group I need to be aware of distance to next turn so that a group of vintage motorcycles behind me with old drum brakes at best do not finish up in a heap behind or worse on top of me.

    I enjoyed the Montana 650T but was always worried about the waterproofing and the need to take a glove off to change anything. Battery life was around 4 hours at best inbuilt or 7 hours with top quality AA Ansmann rechargeables. I was having problems with the AA batteries towards the end with low battery warnings - cannot support somethingorother appearing with half battery life left.

    Thus I would rather see info on what plus points and opinions there are on the 276CX being worth the extra over the Montana 680T than quibbling.

    Battery stats on the two models look odd to me with the 680T running longer on AA and the 276CX running shorter for the same specified length in-built. Must be a mother of a big in-built battery on the 276CX?

    276CX looks more of a pure navigational tool. I'm not interested in geocaching etc and have a far superior camera in the back-pack (Sony RX100 Mark IV). I don't use Bluetooth though. I'm just a bit itchy over those battery stats.


  • Boyd 1735 Points
    Perhaps you should join that thread over at ADVrider and ask some 276 owners about battery life? I agree with your run time numbers on the Montana 600, I also see around 4 hours with the original rechargeable battery on mine. The 16 hour Montana figure no doubt assumes using power saving mode and a short timeout on the backlight in addition to setting it at a low level.

    Here are some comments about the display visibility from the ADVrider thread
    __________

    "As I noted in my review, the 276Cx uses Backlight to enhance sunlight readability. There is very little, if any, reflectance layer in this display. That being said, my subjective view is that this display is brighter in sunlight (with the Backlight on full) than any of the current Moto-branded Garmin devices. If you are not using a Powered Mount, that will have a significant impact on the battery life if one didn't use the Battery Saver and the Backlight Timeout settings to conserve battery."
    ___________

    "Is it readable in the sunlight with the backlight off like montana? Montana is definitely quite reflective even though it may not appear that way if you are comparing it to passive LCD displays"
    ___________

    "As I noted, this display has almost no reflectance. Garmin doesn't even list it as a Transflective display"

  • Thanks, that's the kind of advice I need.

    No sign of the 276Cx being available over here yet though, just pre-orders
  • sussamb 634 Points
    edited November 2016
    I'm surprised at the comments on the Montana battery life. I've never run mine to flat but it'll last for a couple of days when walking. Having said that of course my screen is shut down for most of the time when walking, something that won't be the case if it's being used with the screen permanently on.

    Specs say up to 16 hours, but doesn't say what sort of use gets you that.
  • Boyd 1735 Points
    My 4 hour number assumes a usage pattern like @Chris_Sav, with full backlight brightness, a long timeout and no power saving mode.
  • Just waded through all 20 pages on advrider!!

    276Cx looks to be my best option if the present holder of my Montana 650T turns out to be a thieving scumbag! Seems the nearest to an advanced tool for a long time, but still not the Holy Grail of a true multi-purpose solution.
  • privet01 144 Points
    Garmin shows that a vehicle power cable is available for it. So then battery consumption becomes a moot topic if you are concerned about using it for motorcycle rides.
  • Boyd 1735 Points
    The 276 uses the same active cradle as the Montana.
  • privet01 said:

    Garmin shows that a vehicle power cable is available for it. So then battery consumption becomes a moot topic if you are concerned about using it for motorcycle rides.

    Would have helped if you had read my earlier posts!

    Power cable is about as much use as a chocolate teapot on a 1937 BSA Empire Star with Joe Lucas "Prince of Darkness" electrics that barely have enough power to light a small 6 volt bulb consistently let alone convert to 12 volts for a non existent power socket!

  • Boyd 1735 Points
    There's a company called "goal zero" that makes some pretty cool little power packs (with solar charger options). That (or something similar) might be a way to extend runtime.

    Let us know if you get any input from a current 276 owner about battery life.
  • privet01 144 Points
    Well I did read your earlier posts. But I don't have a perfect memory. Sorry if it inconvenienced you! <<grin>>

    But if the battery capacity is going to be an issue, and you otherwise like the devices other functions, then just add a 12 volt battery of whatever size to the bike or even a bag you keep your lunch in.

    You can get a sealed 7 ampre hour battery for 8 bucks US and charge it with any 12 volt charger or use cables to charge it from a car or bike that does have an adequate 12 volt charging system.
  • Chris_Sav 58 Points
    edited November 2016
    I've done that on my newer (1960's) 6 volt bikes with a useful little gizmo called an anyvolt3 that I pinned out to a USB cable and stuck 5 volts down it, works fine. However I'm not fond of cables hanging around and non damp proof sockets or tank bags that mark the paint so nowadays prefer to carry spare batteries for the beast and change them if necessary.

    Looking more and more likely I'll go for the 276Cx over the 680T.
  • werewolf 107 Points
    Boyd said:

    There's a company called "goal zero" that makes some pretty cool little power packs (with solar charger options). That (or something similar) might be a way to extend runtime.

    Let us know if you get any input from a current 276 owner about battery life.


    If u mean the old 276C I think the battery life is very good, but that is just the informal impression I get the rare times I use it when it is not plugged in to my vehicles' cig lighter.

  • Boyd 1735 Points
    edited November 2016
    No, I was talking about the new device, the 276cx.
  • Montana has not surfaced so looks like I'll be buying the 276Cx or 680T - decisions decisions.
  • Boyd 1735 Points
    Does the 680T actually contain a useful map for your area? In the US it has Garmin's 100k topo which IMO does not justify the extra cost.
  • I was using the excellent TalkyToaster site maps on the 650T which came in two versions allowing the routing to include/ignore byeways. Searching was difficult but I also had the expensive Ordnance Survey maps which were better for searching but very poor in high detail, of course I've lost those with the 650T as they were on the SD card.
  • sussamb 634 Points
    edited November 2016
    Well there are numerous OSM maps, and of course talkytoaster provides free ones as well as the ones he charges for, which personally I don't like. Try the ones from CacheMapUK.
  • Boyd 1735 Points
    Sorry, don't think I understand. Here in the US the $500 (list) Montana 610 is the basic model with no camera and no maps included. The Montana 680T costs $600 and includes a (not very good) topo map and camera. Why would you choose the 680t over the 610?
  • sussamb 634 Points
    I would guess that because here the supplied map is the excellent OS map of the UK ;)
  • Boyd 1735 Points
    Thanks, that's what I was asking but didn't understand the response since he said "I also had the expensive Ordnance Survey maps" which implied he purchased it separately. :)

    Of course, here in the US the equivalent would be our USGS 24k maps, and since they were created with public money, they're free. Or you can purchase a Birdseye Topo subscription for $30 that gives you unlimited downloads of them.

    But the 100k Garmin topo on the "T models" has never been very good.
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