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Information on Birds Eye and SD Card

I'm a noob and new owner of a 755t. I see that I'm entitled to one year of Birds Eye at no charge. Is this already loaded? If not where would I download it? I also inserted a 128 g SD card and the unit didn't recognize it. I'm going to be doing a hunt in Northern Colorado this fall and would like to get the most detailed maps available of the area. Thanks, Steve

Comments

  • t923347 406 Points
    Assuming your referring to the Rino 755T hand held GPS, as far as I know Garmin units will only support an SD card of up to 64GB.
  • scarr25 0 Points
    Yes, the Rino 755t. Thank you very much!!
  • alanb 375 Points
    edited August 17
    Since this is the Garmin handheld forum, by 755T, I assume you are referring to a Garmin Rino and not a nuvi. ;)

    The answer to your question is no, the birds eye images are not already loaded. You install birds eye images via Garmin's Basecamp program. The birds eye images take quite a lot of time to download, and each file is for a fairly limited area (100 sq. miiles or so), so you will want to carefully select the regions you want. You can have multiple birds eye files enabled at the same time. My experience is with the birds eye satellite images, so it may be different for the birds eye topo.

    For the SD card issue, you need to format the card as FAT32. I am not familiar with the rino spec's, but you may need a smaller card (32 GB should be OK, but 64 or 128 may work if formatted as FAT32)
  • scarr25 0 Points
    Thank you Alan!!
  • Boyd 1794 Points
    edited August 17
    This is an old thread, but my numbers should give you some idea of how much coverage you can fit on a card.

    http://forums.gpsreview.net/discussion/comment/126239/#Comment_126239

    Rounding off... figure about 2.5 MB per square mile for the highest quality imagery. So that is about 400 square miles per gigabyte. So, theoretically, you could fit 25,600 square miles on a 64gb SD card. That would be the equivalent of an area 160 miles x 160 miles.

    Now my subscription expired a long time ago, and I know they have made some changes. But according to my old thread, there are 150 image tiles per square mile. I think you will probably hit some other limits before reaching 64gb - that would be almost 4 million tiles and I doubt your device can handle that many, regardless of the memory card size.

    I have a 16gb card that is full of birdseye imagery. When I insert this in my Montana, it takes forever to start up, which I found unacceptable. You will have to do some experiments to see how much imagery actually works well on your GPS.
  • alanb 375 Points
    edited August 17
    On my Oregon 550, I have 10 .jnx (Birdseye satellite) files loaded, each about 250 MB for a total of about 2.5 GB. This covers a rectangular area of approx 32 miles by 30 miles for a total of 980 square miles.

    This pretty much makes my Oregon choke at boot up. It will start the boot then just go dim and unresponsive and never gets to the menu display. If I remove any one of the 10 files it will boot up and operate just fine. Now that I know the practical limit for this device it isn't a problem, but it would be much easier to manage if Garmin allowed you to enable/disable individual .jnx files. But they don't (at least on the Oregon) ... it is all or nothing. So I have to manually rename or remove one of the .jnx files.
  • scarr25 0 Points
    Thank you!
  • Boyd 1794 Points
    edited August 17
    Garmin may have added the ability to enable separate files on newer devices. IIRC, they definitely added that capability for Custom Maps (.kmz files) with one of the Oregon updates (6xx series?). Those older generation Oregon devices are really very sluggish in general. When I used 16gb of imagery on my Montana 600, it did not freeze but booting took over a minute, which seemed like forever. This can be especially frustrating if your gps crashes and you have to restart it.

    I'm surprised you had so much trouble with 2.5gb however. I used that much and more on my Oregon 400t which I believe is one generation older than your 550. I don't remember the kind of problem you describe. Maybe one of your files is corrupted?

    BTW, your numbers would appear to be in agreement with what I posted earlier: 980 sq miles X 2.5MB = 2.45GB. :)
  • alanb 375 Points
    edited August 17
    It was my thought too that one file was corrupt, but I can eliminate any one of the files and it works OK .... I have actually tried it with all 10 files (removing exactly one at a time). Also, BaseCamp has no trouble with the 10 files. I do also have an OpenStreetMap of the US that loads (.IMG file). It is over 3 GB and the Oregon doesn't seem to have a problem with it. I guess I have not tried disabling the OSM while loading all 10 .jnx files. I did delete the 100K topo map that came with the 550.

    Fortunately I keep all the imported files on SD, so when it doesn't boot up, I can remove the card and take corrective action. Otherwise I would now have a brick :)
  • Boyd 1794 Points
    The 3gb OSM file catches my attention there. Do you have it installed along with Birdseye? Might be related...

    I'd check how many map segments it contains. If you have more than 4000 segments (total of all segments in all maps on both the card and internal memory) then it will cause problems. I have read that you can't load the whole US OSM map due to segment limits, but have never used it myself.

    https://support.garmin.com/faqSearch/en-US/faq/content/1Ut7eV6nlp5FV6OtbHmhF6
  • alanb 375 Points
    edited August 17
    That may be the answer Boyd. Sometime I will do some more experimenting to see if eliminating the OSM map solves the boot up issue.

    One other interesting tidbit I forgot to mention is that when all 10 .jnx files are there, it also will not boot into mass storage mode when connected ... shuts down before it gets there. When BirdsEye was 1.0 version (lower resolution) I had the same area loaded with no problem. The problem started when I replaced the 1.0 files with the 2.0 files.
  • Boyd 1794 Points
    I didn't even realize there was a version 2.0. What is different? The original BIrdseye had a resolution of about 2 feet per pixel. The file sizes you posted imply that this is still the same with your imagery. I believe the last time I downloaded anything was 2011.
  • alanb 375 Points
    It has much better resolution than version 1 had. We discussed it back in 2014: http://forums.gpsreview.net/discussion/comment/192912/#Comment_192912

    Unfortunately because of the Photo Bucket going to a pay site, the image that showed the difference is no longer there.
  • alanb 375 Points
    I found the old image showing the difference between V1 and V2 ... will attempt to use another free site. V1 Birdseye is the left half, V2 is the right half image
  • t923347 406 Points
    alan, I've been using Imgur.com as a 3rd party photo site. So far so good.
  • Boyd 1794 Points
    edited August 18
    I had forgotten about that old thread. But it looks like they just improved some of the areas that previously had poor quality imagery instead of a global upgrade. The highest quality Birdseye in NJ never looked as bad as your example on the left. I know there used to be a pretty signifiant regional quality variation with Birdseye. Hopefully the update evened things out in that regard.

    Really, a bigger problem for me was the screen on the Montana and older Oregon series. They don't reproduce this kind of imagery very well and it's hard to see details. Load some on your GPS then hold it up to your computer screen and compare to the way it looks in Basecamp. Have not used a newer Oregon with the glass screen, hopefully that is better.
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