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Help!!!!

Sorry it's a long one!! My partner is a milk man and currently does a big round which he has internalised but there are daily changes of amount of milk for various houses and sometimes cancellations. He is due to take on a new round in a couple of weeks from another milkman who is retiring. This will double his round the houses are in the same area but it will be difficult for him for a good couple of months until he picks it up. I am wondering if there are any sat navs which he could plan his route into he probably has about 100 different drops. This would at least get him to the correct houses quickly. Thinking that this probably doesn't exist but to make it even better if he could input the basic milk order for each stop this would be amazing. If anyone knows any Sat Nav that would be able to do this? I am wondering what parcel companies use I have emailed a couple but got no response.
Any help appreciated. I would love to surprise him with something to make work easier as he already does a 10 hour night shift.
Thamk Kelly

Comments

  • Boyd 1998 Points
    Well, if you're talking about a dedicated automotive GPS devices (as opposed to a smartphone app) then Garmin and TomTom are about your only choices. Garmin devices only allow 30 stops, but you could create multiple routes.

    https://support.garmin.com/en-US/?faq=7S1IiE1e7H4Iw1svGjJlb6

    I don't know of any way to enter the order details for each stop in the route. And just creating/managing a big route like this will be a lot of work. Garmin has a free program called Basecamp that will let you do this on your computer, but it's not as simple as you might think. I suspect the only way to create a working route like this would be actually visiting each home and saving the location in the field, because address lookup is error-prone.

    Sorry, I'm not familiar with the limitations of TomTom devices, maybe someone else can help with that. There are also many smartphone apps with different capabilities that you might look at, but I can't really help there.
  • alanb 555 Points
    You could take a look at a trip planning app like Furkot (www.furkot.com). They claim you can add as many stops as you need and it will optimize the order. Once the entire route is planned and optimized, you could split it in to smaller routes like 25 stops per route and upload them as trips into a Garmin device.

    Disclaimer: I have not used Furkot, so I don't know how well it would work in this application.
  • Boyd 1998 Points
    edited December 2019
    Seems to me this is going to be a big can of worms. Garmin's automotive devices just aren't designed for what you need. I'm not all that into routing, but I think they will always re-calculate your planned route based on the preference you set, such as "fastest" or "shortest". So if there's some order that he already wants to use, it will probably mess that up. And the fact that you will have to split it into four separate routes will make that even worse because the route will be optimized for only 30 of the 100 total stops. . You can use shaping points to force certain route choices, but this gets very complex, especially for 100 stops spread across four files.

    I hate to be discouraging, but this sounds like the kind of gift that can backfire, where you end up buying something expensive and it's too much trouble to actually setup and use, so you both end up feeling bad. Why don't you and your partner do some research together, then you can offer to pay for it *if* you find something that he is comfortable with?
  • sussamb 829 Points
    edited December 2019
    Probably the easiest answer is to use a handheld GPS, drive the route once, save the relevant track and then follow that in future. Using an automotive device as Boyd says isn't going to do it.
  • Boyd 1998 Points
    edited December 2019
    If you really want to make a route, a handheld Garmin device would have advantages. For example, the Montana series allows 250 stops per route.

    https://support.garmin.com/en-PH/?faq=Qmuv3rlqmb7CIDul9G7HkA

    The best way to create the route would be to drive it in the order that you want and save a waypoint at each stop. That way you'll know each point is in the correct place. And the handheld will give you the option of not automatically re-calculating the route, so it will preserve the sequence that you want.

    For something more like an automotive device, there's the Garmin Zumo series which is actually intended for motorcycles. But these devices also allow a large number of points in a route (200?) and should allow you to turn off re-calculation.

    The problem with both of these solutions is that they will be expensive. Sounds like you are in another country, but here in the US the cheapest Montana is $500 list price but can usually be found for around $400.

    https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/p/523640

    But you would have to purchase the City Navigator map and automotive mount separately, so you're talking about a lot of money.

    https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/p/pn/010-11654-00
    https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/c452-c454-c496-p1.html

    The Zumo is also expensive, but it includes the map and vehicle mount.

    https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/on-the-road/motorcycles/cOnTheRoad-cMotorcycles-p1.html

    Having said all this, it still seems like an awkward solution at best. But here are some ideas to consider. Merry Christmas and best holiday wishes!
  • sussamb 829 Points
    You could get away with a free OSM map, so could avoid the need for an expensive Garmin map though.
  • Boyd 1998 Points
    I suppose that depends on the quality of OSM maps at your location. Here in the US, OpenStreetMap is a poor substitute for Garmin City Navigator. I certainly would not trust it for critical routing.
  • sussamb 829 Points
    True, but if he does the route once, sets a track he wouldn't even need a map.
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