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Say you have a $400 Dell Gift Card & can choose...

DeepSnap 181 Points
edited November -1 in GPS Recommendations
between the now $499 TomTom GO 910 & the $899 Garmin Nuvi 660... Dell hasn't shown either the 370 or 670, yet, on their site, but they seem to like to show the highest price on Garmin products....

I used to go to Europe quite a bit when I was in the Navy, but now it's only every 8-10 years. I travel quite a bit within the US, mostly to WASHDC or to Texas and Colorado. I haul a laptop through airports quite a bit, so I like the idea of the flat Nuvis fitting in a briefcase-style laptop bag. Also, the better dash & vent (no vent mounts seem to exist for the TomTom 910) after market mounts for the Nuvis are more attractive. Screen size is almost the same, but thickness (i.e., how well a 910 would fit in a computer bag) is another issue entirely.

The number of waypoints seems a non-issue. If you stop, or take a sidetrip, can't you just re-program a new destination or re-select you previous POI/address destination? For some that may be too complicated, but you can only travel from Pt A to Pt B, or Pt B1 to Pt B2, or whatever, at a time anyway.

I'm not a BlueToother, or a MP3er, but I do use a FM Xmitter with my portable XM radio. Where I live doesn't necessitate the traffic capability, but some of the places I go it would be very nice to have.

I know the TomTom TeleAtlas database, just updated for free for new buyers, supposedly has improved coverage for North America, but did they add enough detail to improve the quality enough to be competitive with NavTeq?

It appears TomTom has fixed many of the problems (mounts, etc.) they had right after intro'ing the 910 last year. My research (going to various retailers) has shown my 57 year old eyes prefer the larger screen, so the 350/360/370 options are not optimal for me.

I guess my question is this: Does it make more sense for me to buy a TomTom 910 for effectively $499-400=$99, or spend an extra $400 on a 660 (effectively paying $499) & worry about $250 European maps when/if I ever get back there? And $499 effectively for a Nuvi is a pretty sweet deal, too.

Either option has its +'s/-'s... just wondered what someone who is in the business thinks.

Thanks in advance.

Comments

  • Tim 1480 Points
    The number of waypoints seems a non-issue. If you stop, or take a sidetrip, can't you just re-program a new destination or re-select you previous POI/address destination?
    There are times depending on your traveling habits where it is a nice feature, but most people can probably get by without it. Going to several destinations in one day and getting stats for the entire route, or one big long drive where you want to deviate from the route the GPS selects a couple of times. I've expanded about this a little more in an article about TomTom Itinerary Planning.
    I know the TomTom TeleAtlas database, just updated for free for new buyers, supposedly has improved coverage for North America, but did they add enough detail to improve the quality enough to be competitive with NavTeq?
    I'm about to release a new article (probably in the next two days) that is the result of a comprehensive study of the latest maps from NAVTEQ (via Garmin) and Tele Atlas (via TomTom) for North America. I think people will be surprised with the results. I consider map vendor almost a non-issue.
    Does it make more sense for me to buy a TomTom 910 for effectively $499-400=$99, or spend an extra $400 on a 660 (effectively paying $499) & worry about $250 European maps when/if I ever get back there? And $499 effectively for a Nuvi is a pretty sweet deal, too.
    If I were you I might lean towards the TomTom. If you don't like it you could always resell it and then get the Nuvi with almost all of the remaining money. If you go for the Nuvi then I wouldn't rush out and buy the European maps until you know you need them... wait and get the newest maps before you go rather than buying them now and then having outdated maps you paid for if it is a few years before you get there.

    You've done a good job distinguishing the features. As you've noted, size and weight are considerably different between the devices and that alone can become a big factor.
  • Tim 1480 Points
    Here is the article I was taking about that I just released comparing NAVTEQ and TeleAtlas.
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