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NEW Garmin OREGON Series

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  • The Oregon 450, 450T and 550 and 550T are still selling well, they have lasted the distance! Of course Garmin's mapping add-ons contribute massively to their success
  • Boyd 1786 Points
    image

    Nice find - thanks! These look thinner than the current models and they have a new button under the power button. Also have Bluetooth and GLONASS. Evidently a new type of dual orientation transreflective screen (?) with LED backlight but same resolution as older models (400x240).

    User interface seems to have been changed with features not available on the Montana, like the waypoint manager. All around, pretty cool but note that it hasn't been FCC approved yet.

    image
  • sussamb 663 Points
    Comes with a nuvi style dashboard for auto use, including lane assist :)

    image image image

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  • babj615 41 Points
    Nice work copy/pasting my post from Groundspeak, sussamb :)

    http://forums.groundspeak.com/GC/index.php?showtopic=306048&view=findpost&p=5185437
  • sussamb 663 Points
    Well I know how busy you are AC :lol:
  • Boyd 1786 Points
    Comes with a nuvi style dashboard for auto use, including lane assist :)
    I noticed that. But I don't see any mention of audio output and no speaker/cradle like the Montana. Unless maybe you can send audio through bluetooth (which would be pretty cool)?

    Anyway, the Oregon screen is mighty small (3") for auto use. Montana is 4", standard widescreen Nuvi's are 4.3".
  • sussamb 663 Points
    Agreed, I struggle often to see my 5" nuvi :D
  • Boyd 1786 Points
    Here's Garmin's press release.

    ____________________

    Incredible High-Res, Multi-Touch Display, GPS+GLONASS and 8 MP Camera-- The New Garmin® Oregon® Series Packs a Punch

    OLATHE, Kan./January 7, 2013/Business Wire — Garmin International Inc., a unit of Garmin Ltd. (NASDAQ: GRMN), the global leader in satellite navigation, today announced the all new Oregon 600/600t and Oregon 650/650t (“t” indicating pre-loaded TOPO maps) touchscreen handheld GPS devices, featuring high-sensitivity GPS + GLONASS, pre-loaded TOPO U.S. 100K maps, worldwide basemap with shaded relief and a faster processor, users won’t just look at maps, they’ll interact with them. Zoom in, pan out, and rotate using multi-touch in any conditions and even with most gloves. The reflective display technology boosts touchscreen brightness so much, maps and displays are as vivid in full bright sunlight as they are in shade. And mark the memories with an 8MP autofocus camera with digital zoom and automatic flash/torch, plus customizable buttons for one-touch image capture and waypoint marking— making the Oregon series a must have for serious outdoorsmen.

    “The new Oregon series was re-designed to fit comfortably in a user’s palm and stylish enough to be mounted in a car,” said Dan Bartel, Garmin’s vice president of worldwide sales. “Oregon uses the sun’s light to produce a display that is twice as bright compared to the previous models and works with many types of gloves. With new customizable buttons, compatibility with Garmin’s robust maps and un-paralleled ruggedness, the Oregon becomes one of the most versatile outdoor GPS devices on the market.”

    The Oregon series has a built-in 3-axis electronic compass with accelerometer tilt compensation, which shows where users are heading even when they are standing still, or not holding it level. Its barometric altimeter tracks changes in pressure to pinpoint users’ altitude, and they even can use it to plot barometric pressure over time, which can help keep an eye on changing weather conditions. And with its high-sensitivity, WAAS/GLONASS enabled GPS receiver and HotFix® satellite prediction, Oregon locates users position quickly and precisely and maintains its GPS location even in heavy cover and deep canyons. When using GLONASS satellites, the time it takes for the receiver to “lock on” to a position is (on average) approximately 20 percent faster than using GPS. And when using both GPS and GLONASS, the receiver has the ability to lock on to 24 more satellites than using GPS alone.

    Also new to the Oregon is the full track view—where users will see the entire elevation plot and quickly move their zoomed view to any place on the plot. Future plot uses users’ mapping data to show them what to expect ahead. Weighing just over 7 ounces, the Oregon 650/650t come with a rechargeable NiMH battery pack (optional with 600/600t) producing a state-of-the-art dual battery system. The battery pack provides up to 16 hours of life on a single charge and will re-charge itself within the unit when external power is detected. When out on a long adventure and additional power is needed, users can use two AA batteries as a backup.

    There is no longer a need to take an additional camera into the outdoors to capture “real” quality photos. Oregon 650/650t's built in 8 megapixel autofocus digital camera takes photos worthy of sharing or printing and keeping. Each photo is geotagged with the location of where it was taken, allowing users to navigate back to that exact spot in the future. Take charge of the next adventure with BaseCamp™, software that lets users view and organize maps, waypoints, routes, and tracks. This free trip-planning software even allows users to create Garmin Adventures— where they can upload their photos for online storage and share with friends, family or fellow explorers. BaseCamp displays topographic map data in 2-D or 3-D on their computer screen, including contour lines and elevation profiles. It also can transfer an unlimited amount of satellite images to the Oregon when paired with a BirdsEye Satellite Imagery subscription; users can even view pictures from other devices on microSD with Oregon's picture viewer. Users can also wirelessly transfer large files like photos, Garmin Adventures and Custom Maps between Oregon 600-series units (or with the Basecamp Mobile app). In addition, the new Oregon series allows for waypoints and tracks to transfer up to 50x faster. Oregon is also ANT+ ™ wireless compatible for heart rate, cadence, chirp and tempe sensors.

    On the road: Optional City Navigator mapping provides detailed street maps, millions of preloaded points of interest and onscreen turn-by-turn directions to your destination, and an optional Auto Nav kit adds a suction mount and car charger. On a hunt or on a hike: Using a separate TOPO U.S. 24K DVD or microSD card brings you the highest level of topographic detail available, with maps comparable to 1:24,000 scale USGS maps, featuring terrain contours, topo elevations, summits, routable roads and trails, parks, coastlines, rivers, lakes and geographical points. On the water: Add BlueChart® g2 maps, which provide everything you need for a great day on the water, including depth contours, navaids and harbors. On the run or on a bike: Ideal for a trail workout, the lightweight Oregon is compatible with Garmin’s heart-rate monitors and speed/cadence sensors, and an optional handlebar mount makes it easy to track your speed, distance, elevation and location.

    Unlimited Geocaching: The Oregon can hold an unlimited number of geocaches and supports GPX files from OpenCaching.com for downloading geocaches and details straight to the unit. Using this paperless geocaching feature, users are not only helping the environment but also improving efficiency. The Oregon stores and displays key information, including location, terrain, difficulty, hints and descriptions— it even filters users caches to make searching a breeze, and connects to Chirp® enabled caches.

    The new Oregon’s are expected to be available in Q1 2013 and will have a suggested retail price of $399.99 (600), $479.99 (600t), $479.99 (650) $549.99 (650t). Oregon is the latest solution from Garmin’s growing outdoor segment, which focuses on developing technologies and innovations to enhance users’ outdoor experiences. Whether it’s Golfing, Hiking, Hunting or Geocaching, Garmin outdoor devices are becoming essential tools for outdoor enthusiast of all levels.
  • Boyd 1786 Points
    Rich is great, but I don't think that's really a "review". :wink:
  • sussamb 663 Points
    Oh I don't know, would be considered a review this side of the pond :lol:
  • Zemartelo 102 Points
    $400 for the base model is a bit steep imo.

    Garmin is missing the boat with these prices.
    People will rather spend kind of money on a smartphone than a dedicated GPS unit.

    I dont expect sales for these units to be very strong mainly because of the price.
    Myself, I guess I will keep my 'old' 550 for a little awhile more...
    $300 is what I would be willing to pay and that would be for the 650 model (with the camera).
  • babj615 41 Points
    $400 for the base model is a bit steep imo.

    Garmin is missing the boat with these prices.
    People will rather spend kind of money on a smartphone than a dedicated GPS unit.

    I dont expect sales for these units to be very strong mainly because of the price.
    Myself, I guess I will keep my 'old' 550 for a little awhile more...
    $300 is what I would be willing to pay and that would be for the 650 model (with the camera).
    Not really. The original Oregon base model was just as expensive, and now for the same money, you get a much more advanced device with several years of free 'R&D' included, no extra charge!
  • Zemartelo 102 Points
    I understand what you are saying but I am talking about a technological point of view.

    Its hard to justify paying for a dedicated GPS machines when for the same price you can get a portable computer (ipad, netbook, android, etc etc).
  • Zemartelo 102 Points
    Can someone confirm that the screen size is actually smaller than the 550 or is it the same?
  • babj615 41 Points
    Same screen size as previous Oregon series.
  • babj615 41 Points
    I understand what you are saying but I am talking about a technological point of view.

    Its hard to justify paying for a dedicated GPS machines when for the same price you can get a portable computer (ipad, netbook, android, etc etc).
    ...and none of those will do you any good trekking through the middle of any canyon, river, lake, or otherwise non-metropolitan environment.

    I'll stick to my dedicated GPSr for GPS - those other toys are great for surfing the internet when I am near an internet connection :)
  • Boyd 1786 Points
    Its hard to justify paying for a dedicated GPS machines when for the same price you can get a portable computer (ipad, netbook, android, etc etc).
    True, and that's the trend in mass produced consumer electronics devices where Apple can sell millions of iPhones the weekend they hit the market. The PND market has taken a big hit from these products, however (last time I checked) Garmin stood out from the others because of strong sales in their handheld/sport products.

    As babj says, these are specialized devices that really can't be replaced with an iPad. And I'd be surprised if Garmin expects you to rush out and replace your Oregon 550 with a new model at these prices.

    If nothing else, these new models are good news for shoppers. The Oregon 450 at $200 is already an attractive deal, and I suspect a bunch of used Oregons will hit the market when the new models start to ship, driving prices even lower.
  • class3 52 Points
    $400 does seem pretty steap in this age of tablets and smartphones. I just bought a no-contract HTC One V for $50 (just to use it with WiFi) and the screen is amazing compared to any handheld GPS. But they also sell way many more smartphones than handheld GPS, which is a very niche product. A handheld GPS is also waterproof, way more rugged and takes regular AA batteries.

    I don't really mind spending a premium on a rugged handheld GPS because it's such an important safety device for hiking and mountaineering. I also usually keep mine for a long time. I had my 60CS for 4 years before I got an eTrex Vista HCx and I've had that one for four years as well.

    My plan is to wait a few months to buy the Oregon 600. Around April REI always has a 20% off coupon so that's $80 off right there. And if you can wait even longer, the prices will always drift down after a year. I think it might be possible to buy the Oregon 600 for $300 by around Black Friday of this year if certain coupons become available.
  • Zemartelo 102 Points
    I think I will wait a few months too until the prices come down to the $300.00 range.
    Would love to get the 650 for $300. :)

    Lots of features to love with these units thou. :)
  • Boyd 1786 Points
    Can someone confirm that the screen size is actually smaller than the 550 or is it the same?
    Same screen size as previous Oregon series.
    Actually the screen on the new Oregon models is smaller, however the difference is small enough that you probably wouldn't notice.

    https://buy.garmin.com/shop/compare.do?cID=143&compareProduct=113532&compareProduct=26875

    Oregon 550: 1.53"W x 2.55"H
    Oregon 650: 1.5"W x 2.5"H
  • Zemartelo 102 Points
    Why would they make the screen smaller? weird.
  • babj615 41 Points
    First of all, that is not enough to be noticeable to the human eye, and I suspect the tiny difference in size is directly related to differences between resistive touchscreen and capacative touchscreen hardware designs.
  • galaxi 5 Points
    1.53"W x 2.55"H (3.8 x 6.3 cm); 3" diag (7.6 cm)
    1.5"W x 2.5"H (3.8 x 6.3 cm); 3" diag (7.6 cm)
  • Boyd 1786 Points
    I agree that we are splitting hairs and that the decision was driven by availability of the display panel they chose. However the fact remains that the new screen is slightly smaller.

    It's funny that they give the real size in decimal inches but round off the metric size... I thought the metric system was supposed to make it easier to express accurate measurements. :lol:

    Assuming that the english units are correct then it should say

    Oregon 550 = 3.89cm x 6.48cm
    Oregon 650 = 3.81cm x 6.35cm

    I could almost suspect that the marketing dept didn't want to call attention to the smaller size. I mean, in my book I'd round 3.89 to 3.9 and 6.48 to 6.5 if I was only using one decimal place.

    But - whatever - it's not a real factor in making a choice. If the new screen is really "twice as bright" then it will be the one to get.
  • Zemartelo 102 Points
    Myself I would prefer a screen the size between the middle of the 550 and the Montana.
    I find the 550 too small and the Montana too big for a handheld. :)
  • Boyd 1786 Points
    Really, I don't care how great the new Oregon is (and it does look great). I am not going to a screen any smaller than my Montana. I don't have a problem hiking with it, although it would be a lot better if they included some kind of clip/carabiner so I didn't have to concoct my own kludge.

    Really the only thing I want from Garmin is a LARGER screen version of the Montana to use in the car. I doubt that I'll ever get that though. If I had that, then I might get an Oregon for the trail. But it sure is handy to only need one gps and the Montana gives me that.
  • class3 52 Points
    I could almost suspect that the marketing dept didn't want to call attention to the smaller size. I mean, in my book I'd round 3.89 to 3.9 and 6.48 to 6.5 if I was only using one decimal place.
    I think the metric units are correct and the inch units are off due to round off conversion. My reasoning is because they made a conversion mistake on the website's specs for the 3597 screen as well. The metric values appear to be correct because the aspect ratio of the inch units is way off for that screen resolution.

    Btw, the new Oregon is suppose to have a faster processor but in a video posted by a European division, the map still takes like a half a second to redraw when you pan it. Arrgh, I wish it didn't do that.
  • Boyd 1786 Points
    I think the metric units are correct and the inch units are off due to round off conversion. My reasoning is because they made a conversion mistake on the website's specs for the 3597 screen as well.
    Well I will take your word for it, because I'll admit I have no clue as to why Garmin does the things they do. :twisted: Most likely it's just the kind of sloppy mistake somebody makes when creating a new product page by cutting/pasting from an old page.
  • sussamb 663 Points
    They sure did some of that ... the new nuvi 7" model specs say they have a 5" screen :twisted:
  • Draco_M 31 Points
    I just sold my 60CSx about two weeks ago with the plan to buy a touchscreen model that would have an interface that was easier for me to use. The Montana would be my first choice but that is more money than I want to spend. The Dakota is a little short on features for the price. So I was pretty sure the Oregon 450 was my best bet, especially since they are $199 new at GPS City. Then the Oregon 600 series is released and I’m wondering if I should hold off a bit. It’s winter in Seattle so I really don’t mind waiting a few months to get a handheld. If the Oregon 450 drops in price to $150 then I’d get that. On the other hand, if the 600 goes to $250 within the next few months that would be in my budget. I think $250 is the absolute most I would pay for a handheld GPS.

    I suppose there is always something newer/faster/cheaper coming out. You just have to take the plunge at some point and not fret over lost opportunity. Any thoughts?
  • Boyd 1786 Points
    Do you mean you want an Oregon 600 for $250? List is $400. I have never seen any significant discounts on a brand new device - based on previous experience I'd say maybe $375 (probably overly optimistic) is the best you could hope. It isn't expected until March 1, so I'd say there is zero chance of it getting down to $250 by the summer. I'd even be surprised to see it at $250 by summer 2014. But that's just my personal opinion.

    The Montana 600 is $470 now at GPSCity. We saw a couple holiday sales for $400 - not sure what the quantities were like there. I paid $500 for mine in July 2011. So the blowout sale price was 20% off original price after a year and a half. That would get the Oregon 600 down to $320 for summer 2014.

    For your budget the Oregon 450 is a good fit. My guess is that you may also be dreaming if you think you can get one of them for $150 new. These premium models don't get the steep discounts they once did.
  • Draco_M 31 Points
    Do you mean you want an Oregon 600 for $250? List is $400. I have never seen any significant discounts on a brand new device - based on previous experience I'd say maybe $375 (probably overly optimistic) is the best you could hope. It isn't expected until March 1, so I'd say there is zero chance of it getting down to $250 by the summer. I'd even be surprised to see it at $250 by summer 2014. But that's just my personal opinion.

    The Montana 600 is $470 now at GPSCity. We saw a couple holiday sales for $400 - not sure what the quantities were like there. I paid $500 for mine in July 2011. So the blowout sale price was 20% off original price after a year and a half. That would get the Oregon 600 down to $320 for summer 2014.

    For your budget the Oregon 450 is a good fit. My guess is that you may also be dreaming if you think you can get one of them for $150 new. These premium models don't get the steep discounts they once did.
    Thanks Boyd. That information really helps. I don't have the historical perspective that you do. I look at the price of an Oregon 450 at $199 and I guess that they were $399 (??) at launch so I guessed that these handhelds drop in price really fast. But that may be an exception. Or I may be incorrect about the Oregon 450 launch price. Either way - the pricing information you provided is useful. I may just go ahead and get the Oregon 450 if it is unlikely that a better deal is likely to come along. Again thanks.
  • Boyd 1786 Points
    Yes I think the Oregon 450 was $400 when announced. But that was 3 years ago.

    http://garmin.blogs.com/pr/2009/12/garmin-grows-in-outdoor-recreation-adding-new-oregon-handhelds-garmin-connect-compatibility-and-free.html?activeBranchId=newsroom

    And $200 is still just the sale price on the 450. Amazon's regular price is $266. So if you don't mind waiting until 2016, maybe you can find an Oregon 600 for close to your target. :D
  • Draco_M 31 Points
    Oh I don't want to wait until 2016 8)

    I'm pretty sure I'll get the Oregon 450 for $199 and have a fun time with it.
  • Really the only thing I want from Garmin is a LARGER screen version of the Montana to use in the car. I doubt that I'll ever get that though. If I had that, then I might get an Oregon for the trail. But it sure is handy to only need one gps and the Montana gives me that.
    Amen to that! Wouldn't a Montana version of the Nuvi 5000, with that big, sharp screen, be wonderful? My ancient eyes would be so appreciative. Maybe I wouldn't have to stop my Jeep just to check out details on the GPS!
  • sviking 141 Points
    I wonder if they'll still have some ridiculous map tile limit like only 4000 tiles on the Montana. You'd think Garmin would release a unit that would let you load ALL of their TOPO US map and have it available for use instead of forcing you to buy a "T" model.
  • sviking 141 Points
    I just sold my 60CSx about two weeks ago with the plan to buy a touchscreen model that would have an interface that was easier for me to use.
    Man, I'd have kept that 60CSx if I were you. It's a great backup GPS and a true classic. Still love mine even though I have a Montana :wink:
  • babj615 41 Points
    I just sold my 60CSx about two weeks ago with the plan to buy a touchscreen model that would have an interface that was easier for me to use.


    Man, I'd have kept that 60CSx if I were you. It's a great backup GPS and a true classic. Still love mine even though I have a Montana :wink:
    Of the many, many Garmin GPSr units I have owned, my 60cs is the only Garmin I have parted with. Just too limited in function.

    I also sold my Lowrance Endura Sierra.

    Use my Montana every day :)
  • sviking 141 Points

    Of the many, many Garmin GPSr units I have owned, my 60cs is the only Garmin I have parted with. Just too limited in function.
    Limited? How so? Was it because you were lacking the "x" feature of removable memory? The 60CSx does everything any other solid unit does for the sole purpose of being a GPS unit. The only thing that ticks me off about mine is not being able to have all of TOPO US loaded at once, but there's workarounds for that so it's not *really* that big of a deal.
  • babj615 41 Points

    Of the many, many Garmin GPSr units I have owned, my 60cs is the only Garmin I have parted with. Just too limited in function.


    Limited? How so? Was it because you were lacking the "x" feature of removable memory? The 60CSx does everything any other solid unit does for the sole purpose of being a GPS unit. The only thing that ticks me off about mine is not being able to have all of TOPO US loaded at once, but there's workarounds for that so it's not *really* that big of a deal.
    I am aware of the work arounds for some of the GPSMap 60 series shortcomings, but not all of them can be overcome.

    Paperless geocaching, a 3-axis compass, more than 256 colors and only a handful of pixels in the display, touch screen interface, etc. etc.

    They are great if you just want to know where you are, and how far your target is from you, but beyond that, the GPSMap 60 series is quite lacking by today's standards.
  • Boyd 1786 Points
    I wouldn't buy as 60csx today - especially at the inflated prices I've heard about. But I'm keeping mine, mainly because.. "it's a classic". I always liked the way it looked and felt, like a professional instrument.

    I almost never use it anymore, but my own tests with waypoints averaged over extended periods led me to believe it was more accurate for that specific task than my Oregon.
  • sviking 141 Points

    Paperless geocaching, a 3-axis compass, more than 256 colors and only a handful of pixels in the display, touch screen interface, etc. etc.
    Those are "nice to haves" and not required for anything a handheld GPS should be able to do. The 60CSx still does everything anyone would need for actual GPS land nav.
  • sviking 141 Points
    I wouldn't buy as 60csx today - especially at the inflated prices I've heard about. But I'm keeping mine, mainly because.. "it's a classic". I always liked the way it looked and felt, like a professional instrument.
    I said the same thing, too, regarding it being a classic. There's no way I'd sell mine because I'd miss it and prices are ridiculous. In fact, there's one right now on Amazon going for well over $600. :shock:

    Always good to have a known, trusted backup unit, too. :wink:
  • Boyd 1786 Points
    I said the same thing, too, regarding it being a classic.
    That's why I put quotes around the phrase in my post. :wink:
  • sussamb 663 Points
    Review here



    although not much detail :roll:
  • alanb 373 Points
    It looks like the Oregon 600 is finally shipping and available in stores. There is a lengthy thread over in the Groundspeak forum where the early adopters are raving about it.
  • babj615 41 Points
    Garmin Oregon 6xx Screen Durability Test:

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