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I hike, fish and drive, so what do I need,,,,Please help!!

coinmn 0 Points
edited November -1 in GPS Recommendations
Help, please!!
I like to hike, fish, hunt morel mushrooms and drive in my vehicle using a GPS. I currently have a Garmin GPS V, and it is a good model although pretty old and basic by today's standards. Unfortunately, it has a serial port connection and the USB to connect it to my computer doesn't work,(even with the new drivers). So I am looking for a new device that I can use hiking and hunting mushrooms, fishing and boating on the Mississippi and MN rivers, and still be functional in my car. I want to be able to update the maps fairly regularly, not too concerned about blue tooth capability, but would like to be able to use Minnesota Lakes Maps while fishing or boating. I don't necessarily need traffic reports either.
Something that can provide me with a location when I am in thick tree cover would be an added benefit, the current Garmin GPS V really needs some good size clearings to give me an accurate location.

Suggestions? Thought about a Nuvi 500, but not sure how well that works in a vehicle. Not sure if a Nuvi 500 is too big to carry around..Thought about a Nuvi 765 and wasn't sure how portable it is...
What type of GPS do you have and why would it work best for me?
Please Help!
thanks

Comments

  • Tim 1481 Points
    I'd talk yourself into getting two devices. One designed to be held in your hand for hiking and fishing (like a Garmin Oregon) and another to be mounted in the car for street navigation (like a Nuvi 200 series). You will pay about the same as you might for a Nuvi 500 but you would have devices better suited to each type of task.
  • lordgrinz 0 Points
    The Nuvi 500 is perfect in a vehicle, and does the other things you ask for, but has some problems. Plus I believe its the only waterproof Nuvi with a replaceable battery, a plus! Heres a list of issue...

    1) Hard to use for hiking without a lanyard to secure it in your hand, no where to add one either.
    2) Lacks a screen lock, so the touch screen will become and issue.
    3) Power button is easily hit accidentally.
    4) No Preloaded marine maps, those are extra cost.
    5) TOPO's are only 1:100K, but free 1:24K maps are available.
    6) No USB cable supplied in the box, so thats and extra cost.
    7) You will probably need a MicroSD card if you plan to add maps.

    Its not a bad unit, its just a little more thought was needed into the design.
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    I'm with Tim on this one. I don't think you will be happy with any of the Nuvi's as a handheld, since you are accustomed to the "classic" Garmin units which have lots of configuration options. The nuvi's basically have none of these. They are very simple to learn and use, but you can't customize hardly anything.

    I think the widescreen Nuvi's (like the 765) are very awkward to carry around because they are too wide to hold comfortably. The 7x5 series has some other issues too - they removed the "most" detail setting, so all the small roads and features disappear when zoomed out further than 0.3 miles.

    Lord has summed up the Nuvi 500 issues pretty well. It is still a dumbed-down Nuvi, but with a few features to make it better suited to outdoor use, like a compass screen and geocaching specific functions. But still none of the advanced menu items you would expect.

    If you like the Oregon, you might try getting that first and see if it is "good enough" for use in your car. The touchscreen makes it suitable for that, but it is smaller than a widescreen Nuvi and there are no voice prompts. You would also have to add the City Navigator maps, a car mount and power cord. Put all that together and it will cost almost the same as just buying a Nuvi 200 or 205 which includes all of these things.
  • Tim hit the nail on the head. Plus, I'd NEVER want a GPS that uses a proprietary rechargeable battery at $40 bucks a pop for use out in the field that lasts NOWHERE near as long as regular AAs. UP TO 8 hours according to Amazon and we all know rechargeable battery packs rarely get the claimed battery life, especially after using them a while.

    Give me cheap AAs you can get anywhere. 8)
  • IIf you like the Oregon, you might try getting that first and see if it is "good enough" for use in your car. The touchscreen makes it suitable for that, but it is smaller than a widescreen Nuvi and there are no voice prompts. You would also have to add the City Navigator maps, a car mount and power cord. Put all that together and it will cost almost the same as just buying a Nuvi 200 or 205 which includes all of these things.
    I know you love your Oregon, but after reading a LOT about the poor screen visibility in sunlight, I wonder how good it would be in the car. I know there's ways to tilt it, shade it, turn the backlight on, etc to make it easier to read, but that's when you're holding it. Not the case in the car since it would need to be in a mount and therefore in a fixed position. Since it doesn't give voice prompts, I'll bet it wouldn't work well at all.
  • Boyd 1985 Points
    I wouldn't be happy with it in the car, but I'm not everyone. Actually, when you plug the Oregon into external power the screen gets MUCH brighter. I have tried it in the car and it wasn't much of a problem. Not quite as bright as some of the Nuvi's, but that is probably OK.

    And like I said, just from an economic point of view it probably makes more sense to get a Nuvi 205 when you consider the cost of the mount, power cord and maps for a handheld.
  • coinmn 0 Points
    Thanks for the comments and suggestions all! Now that I am getting a Oregon or Colorado, which one has AA batteries, better lighting, better reception and just a better product?

    Which Nuvi would you get for the car if you could get any one they make?

    Thanks Again!
  • Thanks for the comments and suggestions all! Now that I am getting a Oregon or Colorado, which one has AA batteries, better lighting, better reception and just a better product?

    Which Nuvi would you get for the car if you could get any one they make?

    Thanks Again!
    They both use common AA batteries. Two each. The consensus I've read has the Colorado as the easier to use "outdoor" screen. People say the touchscreen on the Oregon is what makes it dimmer/hard to read, but I can't back that up with personal experience. I took a long, hard look at those units and ended up with the 60CSx.
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